The effect of different textual narrations on students' explanations at the submicroscopic level in chemistry

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Abstract

The effect of different textual versions (macroscopic (control), submicroscopic, and guided imagery) of the explanation of a chemical phenomenon on students' submicroscopic explanation of a related phenomenon was examined. The sample included 152 pre-service science teachers. The three textual versions of the explanation were distributed randomly to the participants. The results revealed that students who received the submicroscopic version and those who received the guided imagery version outperformed students who received the macroscopic version. These results indicated that students' use of the submicroscopic understanding was not spontaneous and they needed to be cued to do so. Also, the submicroscopic mean scores of all three groups were low, and this might be an indication of a weak ability to: 1) translate between macroscopic and submicroscopic levels of chemistry, and 2) transfer a submicroscopic understanding of one phenomenon to another related one.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-10
Number of pages8
JournalEurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science and Technology Education
Volume9
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

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narration
Chemistry
chemistry
Students
student
indication
Imagery
ability
teacher
science
Group

Keywords

  • Chemistry
  • Guided imagery
  • Macroscopic
  • Submicroscopic
  • Textual narration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

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abstract = "The effect of different textual versions (macroscopic (control), submicroscopic, and guided imagery) of the explanation of a chemical phenomenon on students' submicroscopic explanation of a related phenomenon was examined. The sample included 152 pre-service science teachers. The three textual versions of the explanation were distributed randomly to the participants. The results revealed that students who received the submicroscopic version and those who received the guided imagery version outperformed students who received the macroscopic version. These results indicated that students' use of the submicroscopic understanding was not spontaneous and they needed to be cued to do so. Also, the submicroscopic mean scores of all three groups were low, and this might be an indication of a weak ability to: 1) translate between macroscopic and submicroscopic levels of chemistry, and 2) transfer a submicroscopic understanding of one phenomenon to another related one.",
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