Stress-driven nonlocal elasticity for the instability analysis of fluid-conveying C-BN hybrid-nanotube in a magneto-thermal environment

Hamid M. Sedighi, Hassen M. Ouakad, Rossana Dimitri, Francesco Tornabene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Eringen's strain-driven nonlocal differential model is well-established to exhibit inconsistencies when applied to bounded continua of applicative interest. The stress-driven nonlocal theory leads instead to well-posed nonlocal elastic formulations demonstrating stiffening structural responses. In the present article, using the stress-driven nonlocal model, a comprehensive analysis is conducted to explore the vibrational characteristics and critical divergence velocity of a hybrid-nanotube constructed by carbon (C) and boron nitride (BN) nanotubes conveying magnetic fluid. The impact of size-dependence, magnetic field and thermal medium on the dynamic behavior of the systems is included in the proposed model. The obtained governing equations of two-segment nanotubes are then examined using the finite element method. It is interestingly showed that the threshold of the divergence/flutter instability of the system would be enhanced by employing a hetero-nanotube instead of a nanotube composed of a uniform material. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that the configuration of the mode shapes may be dramatically changed for a nanotube conveying fluid. Therefore, the classical modes do no longer exist, and should not be considered in the dynamics of the system. It is also shown that by assuming a low temperature medium, the critical velocity increases by increasing the temperature and decreases in the case of high temperature.

Original languageEnglish
Article number065204
JournalPhysica Scripta
Volume95
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • fluid-conveying
  • hybrid-nanotube
  • magnetic flow
  • magneto-thermal environment
  • stress-driven nonlocal model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Mathematical Physics
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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