Spectral analysis of gravity anomalies caused by slab-like structures

a Hartley transform technique

N. Sundararajan, G. Rama Brahmam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The spectral analysis of gravity anomalies due to slab like structures with linearly varying density using the Hartley transform, a real valued replacement for the well known complex Fourier transform which is conventionally used in such an analysis, is presented. Being a real valued function, it has specific advantages in terms of computation time, memory and interpretation compared to its progenitor, the Fourier transform. The method is illustrated with a theoretical example and field example from across the mid-oceanic ridge, i.e. 90 east ridge corresponding to latitude 5°N and 5°N and longitude 80°E and 120°E. The results of both the theoretical and practical examples agree well with those of the other conventional methods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-61
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Geophysics
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1998

Fingerprint

mid-ocean ridges
gravity anomalies
longitude
gravity anomaly
spectral analysis
Fourier transform
spectrum analysis
ridges
slab
slabs
transform
replacement
method
analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics

Cite this

Spectral analysis of gravity anomalies caused by slab-like structures : a Hartley transform technique. / Sundararajan, N.; Rama Brahmam, G.

In: Journal of Applied Geophysics, Vol. 39, No. 1, 05.1998, p. 53-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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