Report of a Bite from a New Species of the Echis Genus—Echis omanensis

Badria A. Al Hatali, Said A. Al Mazroui, Abdullah S. Alreesi, Robert J. Geller, Brent W. Morgan, Ziad N. Kazzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Carpet vipers (Echis) are found across the semiarid regions of west, north, and east Africa; west, south, and east Arabia; parts of Iran and Afghanistan north to Uzbekistan; and in Pakistan, India, and Sri Lanka. Recently, a new species belonging to the Echis genus, Echis omanensis has been recognized in Oman. Not much is known about the clinical manifestations of envenomation from its bite. Case Report: A 63-year-old snake keeper presented to the emergency department shortly after being bitten by an Oman carpet viper (E. omanensis). The incident occurred during expression of the venom at a research center. The patient complained of severe pain and swelling of the left index finger, which extended to the mid-forearm within 1 h. His vital signs remained stable, with no evidence of systemic manifestations. He was treated initially with analgesics and tetanus toxoid. Due to rapidly progressive swelling and the potential for a delayed coagulopathy, the Saudi National Guard polyvalent snake antivenom was administered according to the Ministry of Health protocol. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit, remained hemodynamically stable, and had normal serial coagulation tests, with subsequent resolution of the swelling. Conclusion: We report the first case of an E. omanensis bite in which the patient developed rapidly progressive local toxicity, which improved after administration of the Saudi polyvalent antivenom.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)242-244
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Medical Toxicology
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 18 2015

Fingerprint

Bites and Stings
Oman
Antivenins
Swelling
Snakes
Arabia
Uzbekistan
Afghanistan
Northern Africa
Intensive care units
Sri Lanka
Eastern Africa
Tetanus Toxoid
Western Africa
Vital Signs
Pakistan
Venoms
Iran
Coagulation
Forearm

Keywords

  • Echis omanensis
  • Oman
  • Saudi National Guard polyvalent antivenom
  • Snake bite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Al Hatali, B. A., Al Mazroui, S. A., Alreesi, A. S., Geller, R. J., Morgan, B. W., & Kazzi, Z. N. (2015). Report of a Bite from a New Species of the Echis Genus—Echis omanensis. Journal of Medical Toxicology, 11(2), 242-244. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13181-014-0444-x

Report of a Bite from a New Species of the Echis Genus—Echis omanensis. / Al Hatali, Badria A.; Al Mazroui, Said A.; Alreesi, Abdullah S.; Geller, Robert J.; Morgan, Brent W.; Kazzi, Ziad N.

In: Journal of Medical Toxicology, Vol. 11, No. 2, 18.11.2015, p. 242-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al Hatali, BA, Al Mazroui, SA, Alreesi, AS, Geller, RJ, Morgan, BW & Kazzi, ZN 2015, 'Report of a Bite from a New Species of the Echis Genus—Echis omanensis', Journal of Medical Toxicology, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 242-244. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13181-014-0444-x
Al Hatali, Badria A. ; Al Mazroui, Said A. ; Alreesi, Abdullah S. ; Geller, Robert J. ; Morgan, Brent W. ; Kazzi, Ziad N. / Report of a Bite from a New Species of the Echis Genus—Echis omanensis. In: Journal of Medical Toxicology. 2015 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 242-244.
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