Quantifying the feasibility of compressive sensing in portable electroencephalography systems

Amir M. Abdulghani, Alexander J. Casson, Esther Rodriguez-Villegas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The EEG for use in augmented cognition produces large amounts of compressible data from multiple electrodes mounted on the scalp. This huge amount of data needs to be processed, stored and transmitted and consumes large amounts of power. In turn this leads to physically large EEG units with limited lifetimes which limit the ease of use, and robustness and reliability of the recording. This work investigates the suitability of compressive sensing, a recent development in compression theory, for providing online data reduction to decrease the amount of system power required. System modeling which incorporates a review of state-of-the-art EEG suitable integrated circuits shows that compressive sensing offers no benefits when using an EEG system with only a few channels. It can, however, lead to significant power savings in situations where more than approximately 20 channels are required. This result shows that the further investigation and optimization of compressive sensing algorithms for EEG data is justified.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFoundations of Augmented Cognition
Subtitle of host publicationNeuroergonomics and Operational Neuroscience - 5th International Conference, FAC 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009, Proceedings
Pages319-328
Number of pages10
Volume5638 LNAI
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event5th International Conference on Foundations of Augmented Cognition, FAC 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Jul 19 2009Jul 24 2009

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume5638 LNAI
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Other

Other5th International Conference on Foundations of Augmented Cognition, FAC 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period7/19/097/24/09

Fingerprint

Electroencephalography
Compressive Sensing
Augmented Cognition
Power Saving
Data Reduction
Integrated Circuits
System Modeling
Power System
Electrode
Integrated circuits
Data reduction
Lifetime
Compression
Electroencephalogram
Robustness
Decrease
Electrodes
Unit
Optimization

Keywords

  • Compressive sensing
  • Electroencephalogram
  • Power efficient
  • Wireless systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Abdulghani, A. M., Casson, A. J., & Rodriguez-Villegas, E. (2009). Quantifying the feasibility of compressive sensing in portable electroencephalography systems. In Foundations of Augmented Cognition: Neuroergonomics and Operational Neuroscience - 5th International Conference, FAC 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009, Proceedings (Vol. 5638 LNAI, pp. 319-328). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 5638 LNAI). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02812-0_38

Quantifying the feasibility of compressive sensing in portable electroencephalography systems. / Abdulghani, Amir M.; Casson, Alexander J.; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther.

Foundations of Augmented Cognition: Neuroergonomics and Operational Neuroscience - 5th International Conference, FAC 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009, Proceedings. Vol. 5638 LNAI 2009. p. 319-328 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 5638 LNAI).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abdulghani, AM, Casson, AJ & Rodriguez-Villegas, E 2009, Quantifying the feasibility of compressive sensing in portable electroencephalography systems. in Foundations of Augmented Cognition: Neuroergonomics and Operational Neuroscience - 5th International Conference, FAC 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009, Proceedings. vol. 5638 LNAI, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 5638 LNAI, pp. 319-328, 5th International Conference on Foundations of Augmented Cognition, FAC 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009, San Diego, CA, United States, 7/19/09. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02812-0_38
Abdulghani AM, Casson AJ, Rodriguez-Villegas E. Quantifying the feasibility of compressive sensing in portable electroencephalography systems. In Foundations of Augmented Cognition: Neuroergonomics and Operational Neuroscience - 5th International Conference, FAC 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009, Proceedings. Vol. 5638 LNAI. 2009. p. 319-328. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-02812-0_38
Abdulghani, Amir M. ; Casson, Alexander J. ; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther. / Quantifying the feasibility of compressive sensing in portable electroencephalography systems. Foundations of Augmented Cognition: Neuroergonomics and Operational Neuroscience - 5th International Conference, FAC 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009, Proceedings. Vol. 5638 LNAI 2009. pp. 319-328 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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