Potential use of petroleum-contaminated soil in hot mix asphalt concrete

H. Hassan, A. Al-Rawas, A. Al-Futaisi, A. Al-Jamrah, R. Taha, A. Hago

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Petroleum-Contaminated Soil (PCS) results from leaking underground storage tanks, oil spills on clean soils, or soils surrounding petroleum refineries and crude oil wells. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) generates more than 50,000 tons/year of petroleum-contaminated soil (PCS) and faces a real challenge to safely dispose of these quantities. PDO is currently practicing the bioremediation process with high cost and limited results. This paper presents the results of using PCS as an fine aggregate substitute in Hot Mix Asphalt concrete (HMA) with percentages up to 40%, by total aggregate weight. Environmental assessment was performed by analyzing the raw contaminated soil for heavy metals, and hydrocarbons. The Marshall mix design method was used to prepare and test the mixes. The results indicated a reduction in optimum asphalt content from 4.1% in the control mix to 3.5% in the PCS mixes. The increase in PCS content up to 40% resulted in a reduction in stability from 24. 3 to 4.7 kN and increase in air voids from 3.5 to 9.4%. The flow was within the limits of specifications. Leaching of heavy metals using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was also performed on selected mixes. The results indicated concentrations well below the TCLP regulatory limits except for Zn for the 40% PCS mixes. The results indicated potential use of up to 15% PCS in surface mixes, while higher percentages (up to 40%) can however be used for medium or light traffic surface or base course layers.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAirfield and Highway Pavements: Meeting Today's Challenges with Emerging Technologies - Proceedings of the 2006 Airfield and Highway Pavement Specialty Conference
Pages388-399
Number of pages12
Volume2006
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Event2006 Airfield and Highway Pavement Specialty Conference - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: Apr 30 2006May 3 2006

Other

Other2006 Airfield and Highway Pavement Specialty Conference
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period4/30/065/3/06

Fingerprint

Asphalt concrete
Crude oil
Soils
Leaching
Heavy metals
Toxicity
Petroleum refineries
Oil wells
Bioremediation
Oil spills
Asphalt
Hydrocarbons
Specifications

Keywords

  • Asphalt Concrete
  • Contaminated Soil
  • Heavy Metals
  • TCLP
  • VOC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Hassan, H., Al-Rawas, A., Al-Futaisi, A., Al-Jamrah, A., Taha, R., & Hago, A. (2006). Potential use of petroleum-contaminated soil in hot mix asphalt concrete. In Airfield and Highway Pavements: Meeting Today's Challenges with Emerging Technologies - Proceedings of the 2006 Airfield and Highway Pavement Specialty Conference (Vol. 2006, pp. 388-399)

Potential use of petroleum-contaminated soil in hot mix asphalt concrete. / Hassan, H.; Al-Rawas, A.; Al-Futaisi, A.; Al-Jamrah, A.; Taha, R.; Hago, A.

Airfield and Highway Pavements: Meeting Today's Challenges with Emerging Technologies - Proceedings of the 2006 Airfield and Highway Pavement Specialty Conference. Vol. 2006 2006. p. 388-399.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hassan, H, Al-Rawas, A, Al-Futaisi, A, Al-Jamrah, A, Taha, R & Hago, A 2006, Potential use of petroleum-contaminated soil in hot mix asphalt concrete. in Airfield and Highway Pavements: Meeting Today's Challenges with Emerging Technologies - Proceedings of the 2006 Airfield and Highway Pavement Specialty Conference. vol. 2006, pp. 388-399, 2006 Airfield and Highway Pavement Specialty Conference, Atlanta, GA, United States, 4/30/06.
Hassan H, Al-Rawas A, Al-Futaisi A, Al-Jamrah A, Taha R, Hago A. Potential use of petroleum-contaminated soil in hot mix asphalt concrete. In Airfield and Highway Pavements: Meeting Today's Challenges with Emerging Technologies - Proceedings of the 2006 Airfield and Highway Pavement Specialty Conference. Vol. 2006. 2006. p. 388-399
Hassan, H. ; Al-Rawas, A. ; Al-Futaisi, A. ; Al-Jamrah, A. ; Taha, R. ; Hago, A. / Potential use of petroleum-contaminated soil in hot mix asphalt concrete. Airfield and Highway Pavements: Meeting Today's Challenges with Emerging Technologies - Proceedings of the 2006 Airfield and Highway Pavement Specialty Conference. Vol. 2006 2006. pp. 388-399
@inproceedings{b96aebf037694de7a058aba75cb90842,
title = "Potential use of petroleum-contaminated soil in hot mix asphalt concrete",
abstract = "Petroleum-Contaminated Soil (PCS) results from leaking underground storage tanks, oil spills on clean soils, or soils surrounding petroleum refineries and crude oil wells. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) generates more than 50,000 tons/year of petroleum-contaminated soil (PCS) and faces a real challenge to safely dispose of these quantities. PDO is currently practicing the bioremediation process with high cost and limited results. This paper presents the results of using PCS as an fine aggregate substitute in Hot Mix Asphalt concrete (HMA) with percentages up to 40{\%}, by total aggregate weight. Environmental assessment was performed by analyzing the raw contaminated soil for heavy metals, and hydrocarbons. The Marshall mix design method was used to prepare and test the mixes. The results indicated a reduction in optimum asphalt content from 4.1{\%} in the control mix to 3.5{\%} in the PCS mixes. The increase in PCS content up to 40{\%} resulted in a reduction in stability from 24. 3 to 4.7 kN and increase in air voids from 3.5 to 9.4{\%}. The flow was within the limits of specifications. Leaching of heavy metals using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was also performed on selected mixes. The results indicated concentrations well below the TCLP regulatory limits except for Zn for the 40{\%} PCS mixes. The results indicated potential use of up to 15{\%} PCS in surface mixes, while higher percentages (up to 40{\%}) can however be used for medium or light traffic surface or base course layers.",
keywords = "Asphalt Concrete, Contaminated Soil, Heavy Metals, TCLP, VOC",
author = "H. Hassan and A. Al-Rawas and A. Al-Futaisi and A. Al-Jamrah and R. Taha and A. Hago",
year = "2006",
language = "English",
isbn = "0784408386",
volume = "2006",
pages = "388--399",
booktitle = "Airfield and Highway Pavements: Meeting Today's Challenges with Emerging Technologies - Proceedings of the 2006 Airfield and Highway Pavement Specialty Conference",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Potential use of petroleum-contaminated soil in hot mix asphalt concrete

AU - Hassan, H.

AU - Al-Rawas, A.

AU - Al-Futaisi, A.

AU - Al-Jamrah, A.

AU - Taha, R.

AU - Hago, A.

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Petroleum-Contaminated Soil (PCS) results from leaking underground storage tanks, oil spills on clean soils, or soils surrounding petroleum refineries and crude oil wells. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) generates more than 50,000 tons/year of petroleum-contaminated soil (PCS) and faces a real challenge to safely dispose of these quantities. PDO is currently practicing the bioremediation process with high cost and limited results. This paper presents the results of using PCS as an fine aggregate substitute in Hot Mix Asphalt concrete (HMA) with percentages up to 40%, by total aggregate weight. Environmental assessment was performed by analyzing the raw contaminated soil for heavy metals, and hydrocarbons. The Marshall mix design method was used to prepare and test the mixes. The results indicated a reduction in optimum asphalt content from 4.1% in the control mix to 3.5% in the PCS mixes. The increase in PCS content up to 40% resulted in a reduction in stability from 24. 3 to 4.7 kN and increase in air voids from 3.5 to 9.4%. The flow was within the limits of specifications. Leaching of heavy metals using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was also performed on selected mixes. The results indicated concentrations well below the TCLP regulatory limits except for Zn for the 40% PCS mixes. The results indicated potential use of up to 15% PCS in surface mixes, while higher percentages (up to 40%) can however be used for medium or light traffic surface or base course layers.

AB - Petroleum-Contaminated Soil (PCS) results from leaking underground storage tanks, oil spills on clean soils, or soils surrounding petroleum refineries and crude oil wells. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) generates more than 50,000 tons/year of petroleum-contaminated soil (PCS) and faces a real challenge to safely dispose of these quantities. PDO is currently practicing the bioremediation process with high cost and limited results. This paper presents the results of using PCS as an fine aggregate substitute in Hot Mix Asphalt concrete (HMA) with percentages up to 40%, by total aggregate weight. Environmental assessment was performed by analyzing the raw contaminated soil for heavy metals, and hydrocarbons. The Marshall mix design method was used to prepare and test the mixes. The results indicated a reduction in optimum asphalt content from 4.1% in the control mix to 3.5% in the PCS mixes. The increase in PCS content up to 40% resulted in a reduction in stability from 24. 3 to 4.7 kN and increase in air voids from 3.5 to 9.4%. The flow was within the limits of specifications. Leaching of heavy metals using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was also performed on selected mixes. The results indicated concentrations well below the TCLP regulatory limits except for Zn for the 40% PCS mixes. The results indicated potential use of up to 15% PCS in surface mixes, while higher percentages (up to 40%) can however be used for medium or light traffic surface or base course layers.

KW - Asphalt Concrete

KW - Contaminated Soil

KW - Heavy Metals

KW - TCLP

KW - VOC

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33744938183&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33744938183&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 0784408386

SN - 9780784408384

VL - 2006

SP - 388

EP - 399

BT - Airfield and Highway Pavements: Meeting Today's Challenges with Emerging Technologies - Proceedings of the 2006 Airfield and Highway Pavement Specialty Conference

ER -