Leukocoria in children

Syed Haider, Waseem Qureshi, Amanat Ali

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to establish the causes of leukocoria in pediatric patients in a tertiary hospital environment. All patients younger than 10 years who presented with leukocoria between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2000, were included in the study; 39 (55%) patients were boys and 32 (45%) patients were girls. Sixty percent of the patients who presented with leukocoria had congenital cataract (18% unilateral and 42% bilateral). Other causes included retinoblastoma (11% unilateral and 7% bilateral), retinal detachment (2.8% unilateral and 1.4% bilateral), bilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (4.2%), and unilateral Coats' disease (4.2%). Leukocoria in children demands immediate attention because a significant number of children have pathology that either threatens life or causes permanent visual disability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)179-180
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2008

Fingerprint

Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous
Retinal Telangiectasis
Retinoblastoma
Retinal Detachment
Tertiary Care Centers
Cataract
Pediatrics
Pathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Leukocoria in children. / Haider, Syed; Qureshi, Waseem; Ali, Amanat.

In: Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, Vol. 45, No. 3, 05.2008, p. 179-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haider, Syed ; Qureshi, Waseem ; Ali, Amanat. / Leukocoria in children. In: Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. 2008 ; Vol. 45, No. 3. pp. 179-180.
@article{bd5c8896adb448fdacbea22f75e9430e,
title = "Leukocoria in children",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to establish the causes of leukocoria in pediatric patients in a tertiary hospital environment. All patients younger than 10 years who presented with leukocoria between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2000, were included in the study; 39 (55{\%}) patients were boys and 32 (45{\%}) patients were girls. Sixty percent of the patients who presented with leukocoria had congenital cataract (18{\%} unilateral and 42{\%} bilateral). Other causes included retinoblastoma (11{\%} unilateral and 7{\%} bilateral), retinal detachment (2.8{\%} unilateral and 1.4{\%} bilateral), bilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (4.2{\%}), and unilateral Coats' disease (4.2{\%}). Leukocoria in children demands immediate attention because a significant number of children have pathology that either threatens life or causes permanent visual disability.",
author = "Syed Haider and Waseem Qureshi and Amanat Ali",
year = "2008",
month = "5",
doi = "10.3928/01913913-20080501-13",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "179--180",
journal = "Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus",
issn = "0191-3913",
publisher = "Slack Incorporated",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Leukocoria in children

AU - Haider, Syed

AU - Qureshi, Waseem

AU - Ali, Amanat

PY - 2008/5

Y1 - 2008/5

N2 - The aim of this study was to establish the causes of leukocoria in pediatric patients in a tertiary hospital environment. All patients younger than 10 years who presented with leukocoria between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2000, were included in the study; 39 (55%) patients were boys and 32 (45%) patients were girls. Sixty percent of the patients who presented with leukocoria had congenital cataract (18% unilateral and 42% bilateral). Other causes included retinoblastoma (11% unilateral and 7% bilateral), retinal detachment (2.8% unilateral and 1.4% bilateral), bilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (4.2%), and unilateral Coats' disease (4.2%). Leukocoria in children demands immediate attention because a significant number of children have pathology that either threatens life or causes permanent visual disability.

AB - The aim of this study was to establish the causes of leukocoria in pediatric patients in a tertiary hospital environment. All patients younger than 10 years who presented with leukocoria between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2000, were included in the study; 39 (55%) patients were boys and 32 (45%) patients were girls. Sixty percent of the patients who presented with leukocoria had congenital cataract (18% unilateral and 42% bilateral). Other causes included retinoblastoma (11% unilateral and 7% bilateral), retinal detachment (2.8% unilateral and 1.4% bilateral), bilateral persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (4.2%), and unilateral Coats' disease (4.2%). Leukocoria in children demands immediate attention because a significant number of children have pathology that either threatens life or causes permanent visual disability.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=45549103495&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=45549103495&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3928/01913913-20080501-13

DO - 10.3928/01913913-20080501-13

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 179

EP - 180

JO - Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

JF - Journal of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

SN - 0191-3913

IS - 3

ER -