Evaluation of polyurethanes as potential mud loss control agents

Fathi Boukadi, Basma Yaghi, Ali Bemani, Hamoud Al-Hadrami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, polyurethanes have been selected as potential lost circulation materials (LCMs) that will be introduced in wellbores having experienced serious drilling mud losses. The chemicals will be mixed at surface, pumped downhole, let to bridge/foam and seal open fractures/channels. Different tests have been carried out to investigate better ways of mixing and handling polyurethanes before pumping. In that, prospects of slowing down polyurethane reactions by decreasing the amount of activator and adding different proportions of diesel were investigated. Testing the effect of moisture on polyurethanes also was tested. Furthermore, testing using diesel, toluene, xylene, Musol, acetone, glycol, light crude oil, Safrasol as carrier fluids was undertaken. The mixing sequence of diluents and polyurethanes also was thought of and the effect of mixing water on foaming reaction also was investigated. Placement under pressure of pumped polyurethanes also was investigated. It was revealed that pressure enhances polyurethane sealing capability. Adhesion and sealability experiments, in open fractures with apertures of 0.5 mm and 1.5 mm, also indicated that tested polyurethanes are the best candidates guaranteeing a good spreadability within open fractures. Bridging and sealing fracture apertures of up to 5 mm have been achieved with success. Sealability of even larger fracture apertures amounting to 2 inches also has been accomplished.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-70
Number of pages12
JournalEnergy Sources, Part A: Recovery, Utilization and Environmental Effects
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2006

Fingerprint

Polyurethanes
Drilling fluids
Testing
Xylene
Glycols
Acetone
Seals
Toluene
Foams
Moisture
Adhesion
Crude oil
Fluids
Water
Experiments

Keywords

  • Fractures
  • Lost circulation material
  • Mud loss
  • Polyurethanes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Nuclear Energy and Engineering
  • Fuel Technology
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology

Cite this

Evaluation of polyurethanes as potential mud loss control agents. / Boukadi, Fathi; Yaghi, Basma; Bemani, Ali; Al-Hadrami, Hamoud.

In: Energy Sources, Part A: Recovery, Utilization and Environmental Effects, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 59-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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