Effect of seasonal temperatures and ascorbic acid supplementation on performance of broiler chickens maintained in closed and open-sided houses

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Abstract

The efficacy of ascorbic acid in drinking water on performance of broiler chickens under closed and open-sided houses during hot (ambient temperature 36°C) and cool (ambient temperature 23°C) seasons were studied. The temperatures inside the poultry houses were 26°C (closed), 29°C (open-sided), 32°C (closed) and 37°C (open-sided) for cool and hot seasons, respectively. One-day-old chicks (432 birds) were housed in each closed and open-sided environment for each season. Birds were maintained under 23 hrs light and 1 hr dark cycle and offered ad libitum access water and feed. Broilers in both houses were randomly subjected to four drinking water treatments (9 birds in each 6 replicates/treatment): 0, 100, 200 and 300 ppm ascorbic acid. Feed intake, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio and rectal temperatures were recorded weekly. Ascorbic acid supplementation at 200-300 ppm was associated with a reduction in rectal temperatures during the hot season. Open-sided house depressed body weight gain and feed conversion ratio (P <0.05) during hot season. Compared to the control group, ascorbic acid improved feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio by 6%, 9% and 3% (cool season) and 8%, 11% and 5% (hot season). Birds supplemented with 200 ppm ascorbic acid had (P <0.05) higher feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio than the control group during the cool season, while 300 ppm (P <0.05) improved broiler performance including feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio during the hot season. Bird's rectal temperature was higher (P <0.05) during hot season in open-sided house and (P <0.05) reduced by supplementing 200-300 ppm ascorbic acid. This study demonstrated that seasonal temperatures had a significant effect on broiler performance in open-sided house. Supplementation of drinking water with 200-300 ppm ascorbic acid ameliorated broiler performance in open-sided housing at high ambient temperatures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)655-660
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Poultry Science
Volume7
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

warm season
Ascorbic Acid
Chickens
ascorbic acid
broiler chickens
Temperature
feed conversion
weight gain
Weight Gain
Birds
feed intake
body weight
temperature
birds
drinking water
Body Weight
ambient temperature
Drinking Water
poultry housing
Hot Temperature

Keywords

  • Ascorbic acid
  • Chicken performance
  • Open-sided house
  • Seasonal temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Food Animals

Cite this

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title = "Effect of seasonal temperatures and ascorbic acid supplementation on performance of broiler chickens maintained in closed and open-sided houses",
abstract = "The efficacy of ascorbic acid in drinking water on performance of broiler chickens under closed and open-sided houses during hot (ambient temperature 36°C) and cool (ambient temperature 23°C) seasons were studied. The temperatures inside the poultry houses were 26°C (closed), 29°C (open-sided), 32°C (closed) and 37°C (open-sided) for cool and hot seasons, respectively. One-day-old chicks (432 birds) were housed in each closed and open-sided environment for each season. Birds were maintained under 23 hrs light and 1 hr dark cycle and offered ad libitum access water and feed. Broilers in both houses were randomly subjected to four drinking water treatments (9 birds in each 6 replicates/treatment): 0, 100, 200 and 300 ppm ascorbic acid. Feed intake, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio and rectal temperatures were recorded weekly. Ascorbic acid supplementation at 200-300 ppm was associated with a reduction in rectal temperatures during the hot season. Open-sided house depressed body weight gain and feed conversion ratio (P <0.05) during hot season. Compared to the control group, ascorbic acid improved feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio by 6{\%}, 9{\%} and 3{\%} (cool season) and 8{\%}, 11{\%} and 5{\%} (hot season). Birds supplemented with 200 ppm ascorbic acid had (P <0.05) higher feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio than the control group during the cool season, while 300 ppm (P <0.05) improved broiler performance including feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio during the hot season. Bird's rectal temperature was higher (P <0.05) during hot season in open-sided house and (P <0.05) reduced by supplementing 200-300 ppm ascorbic acid. This study demonstrated that seasonal temperatures had a significant effect on broiler performance in open-sided house. Supplementation of drinking water with 200-300 ppm ascorbic acid ameliorated broiler performance in open-sided housing at high ambient temperatures.",
keywords = "Ascorbic acid, Chicken performance, Open-sided house, Seasonal temperature",
author = "Kadim, {I. T.} and Al-Qamshui, {B. H A} and O. Mahgoub and W. Al-Marzooqi and Johnson, {E. H.}",
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AU - Kadim, I. T.

AU - Al-Qamshui, B. H A

AU - Mahgoub, O.

AU - Al-Marzooqi, W.

AU - Johnson, E. H.

PY - 2008

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N2 - The efficacy of ascorbic acid in drinking water on performance of broiler chickens under closed and open-sided houses during hot (ambient temperature 36°C) and cool (ambient temperature 23°C) seasons were studied. The temperatures inside the poultry houses were 26°C (closed), 29°C (open-sided), 32°C (closed) and 37°C (open-sided) for cool and hot seasons, respectively. One-day-old chicks (432 birds) were housed in each closed and open-sided environment for each season. Birds were maintained under 23 hrs light and 1 hr dark cycle and offered ad libitum access water and feed. Broilers in both houses were randomly subjected to four drinking water treatments (9 birds in each 6 replicates/treatment): 0, 100, 200 and 300 ppm ascorbic acid. Feed intake, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio and rectal temperatures were recorded weekly. Ascorbic acid supplementation at 200-300 ppm was associated with a reduction in rectal temperatures during the hot season. Open-sided house depressed body weight gain and feed conversion ratio (P <0.05) during hot season. Compared to the control group, ascorbic acid improved feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio by 6%, 9% and 3% (cool season) and 8%, 11% and 5% (hot season). Birds supplemented with 200 ppm ascorbic acid had (P <0.05) higher feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio than the control group during the cool season, while 300 ppm (P <0.05) improved broiler performance including feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio during the hot season. Bird's rectal temperature was higher (P <0.05) during hot season in open-sided house and (P <0.05) reduced by supplementing 200-300 ppm ascorbic acid. This study demonstrated that seasonal temperatures had a significant effect on broiler performance in open-sided house. Supplementation of drinking water with 200-300 ppm ascorbic acid ameliorated broiler performance in open-sided housing at high ambient temperatures.

AB - The efficacy of ascorbic acid in drinking water on performance of broiler chickens under closed and open-sided houses during hot (ambient temperature 36°C) and cool (ambient temperature 23°C) seasons were studied. The temperatures inside the poultry houses were 26°C (closed), 29°C (open-sided), 32°C (closed) and 37°C (open-sided) for cool and hot seasons, respectively. One-day-old chicks (432 birds) were housed in each closed and open-sided environment for each season. Birds were maintained under 23 hrs light and 1 hr dark cycle and offered ad libitum access water and feed. Broilers in both houses were randomly subjected to four drinking water treatments (9 birds in each 6 replicates/treatment): 0, 100, 200 and 300 ppm ascorbic acid. Feed intake, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio and rectal temperatures were recorded weekly. Ascorbic acid supplementation at 200-300 ppm was associated with a reduction in rectal temperatures during the hot season. Open-sided house depressed body weight gain and feed conversion ratio (P <0.05) during hot season. Compared to the control group, ascorbic acid improved feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio by 6%, 9% and 3% (cool season) and 8%, 11% and 5% (hot season). Birds supplemented with 200 ppm ascorbic acid had (P <0.05) higher feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio than the control group during the cool season, while 300 ppm (P <0.05) improved broiler performance including feed intake, body weight gain and feed conversion ratio during the hot season. Bird's rectal temperature was higher (P <0.05) during hot season in open-sided house and (P <0.05) reduced by supplementing 200-300 ppm ascorbic acid. This study demonstrated that seasonal temperatures had a significant effect on broiler performance in open-sided house. Supplementation of drinking water with 200-300 ppm ascorbic acid ameliorated broiler performance in open-sided housing at high ambient temperatures.

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