Developing hemophilia services in India.

M. Chandy, U. Khanduri, D. Dennison

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

With a population of 853 million there should be 51,204 patients with hemophilia A in India assuming a prevalence of 6/100,000 population. With the current birth rate of 32/1000, 1,300 new patients with hemophilia A will be born each year. Hospital based data suggests that hemophiliacs in India suffer from preventable morbidity because doctors do not know enough about the disease and its management, because laboratory diagnostic facilities are inadequate and because there is not enough therapeutic material or even if it is available the patients do not have the resources to purchase it. This article reviews the current status of hemophilia in India and suggests measures to improve hemophilia services within the health care infrastructure available in the country.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-68
Number of pages3
JournalThe Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health
Volume24 Suppl 1
Publication statusPublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Hemophilia A
India
Birth Rate
Disease Management
Population
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Developing hemophilia services in India. / Chandy, M.; Khanduri, U.; Dennison, D.

In: The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health, Vol. 24 Suppl 1, 1993, p. 66-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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