Cultured meat from muscle stem cells

A review of challenges and prospects

Isam T. Kadim, Osman Mahgoub, Senan Baqir, Bernard Faye, Roger Purchas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Growing muscle tissue in culture from animal stem cells to produce meat theoretically eliminates the need to sacrifice animals. So-called "cultured" or "synthetic" or "in vitro" meat could in theory be constructed with different characteristics and be produced faster and more efficiently than traditional meat. The technique to generate cultured muscle tissues from stem cells was described long ago, but has not yet been developed for the commercial production of cultured meat products. The technology is at an early stage and prerequisites of implementation include a reasonably high level of consumer acceptance, and the development of commercially-viable means of large scale production. Recent advancements in tissue culture techniques suggest that production may be economically feasible, provided it has physical properties in terms of colour, flavour, aroma, texture and palatability that are comparable to conventional meat. Although considerable progress has been made during recent years, important issues remain to be resolved, including the characterization of social and ethical constraints, the fine-tuning of culture conditions, and the development of culture media that are cost-effective and free of animal products. Consumer acceptance and confidence in in vitro produced cultured meat might be a significant impediment that hinders the marketing process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)222-233
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Integrative Agriculture
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Meats
Stem cells
meat
Meat
myocytes
Muscle Cells
Muscle
stem cells
muscle
Stem Cells
stem
consumer acceptance
Animals
muscle tissues
tissue culture
Tissue Culture Techniques
Muscles
Meat Products
Tissue
animal products

Keywords

  • Conventional meat
  • Cultured meat
  • Environmental impact
  • Stem cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Food Science
  • Plant Science
  • Biochemistry
  • Ecology
  • Food Animals

Cite this

Cultured meat from muscle stem cells : A review of challenges and prospects. / Kadim, Isam T.; Mahgoub, Osman; Baqir, Senan; Faye, Bernard; Purchas, Roger.

In: Journal of Integrative Agriculture, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 222-233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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