Complex Epidemiology of a Zoonotic Disease in a Culturally Diverse Region

Phylogeography of Rabies Virus in the Middle East

Daniel L. Horton, Lorraine M. McElhinney, Conrad M. Freuling, Denise A. Marston, Ashley C. Banyard, Hooman Goharrriz, Emma Wise, Andrew C. Breed, Greg Saturday, Jolanta Kolodziejek, Erika Zilahi, Muhannad F. Al-Kobaisi, Norbert Nowotny, Thomas Mueller, Anthony R. Fooks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Middle East is a culturally and politically diverse region at the gateway between Europe, Africa and Asia. Spatial dynamics of the fatal zoonotic disease rabies among countries of the Middle East and surrounding regions is poorly understood. An improved understanding of virus distribution is necessary to direct control methods. Previous studies have suggested regular trans-boundary movement, but have been unable to infer direction. Here we address these issues, by investigating the evolution of 183 rabies virus isolates collected from over 20 countries between 1972 and 2014. We have undertaken a discrete phylogeographic analysis on a subset of 139 samples to infer where and when movements of rabies have occurred. We provide evidence for four genetically distinct clades with separate origins currently circulating in the Middle East and surrounding countries. Introductions of these viruses have been followed by regular and multidirectional trans-boundary movements in some parts of the region, but relative isolation in others. There is evidence for minimal regular incursion of rabies from Central and Eastern Asia. These data support current initiatives for regional collaboration that are essential for rabies elimination.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0003569
JournalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 26 2015

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Phylogeography
Rabies virus
Middle East
Rabies
Zoonoses
Epidemiology
Central Asia
Viruses
Far East

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Horton, D. L., McElhinney, L. M., Freuling, C. M., Marston, D. A., Banyard, A. C., Goharrriz, H., ... Fooks, A. R. (2015). Complex Epidemiology of a Zoonotic Disease in a Culturally Diverse Region: Phylogeography of Rabies Virus in the Middle East. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 9(3), [e0003569]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003569

Complex Epidemiology of a Zoonotic Disease in a Culturally Diverse Region : Phylogeography of Rabies Virus in the Middle East. / Horton, Daniel L.; McElhinney, Lorraine M.; Freuling, Conrad M.; Marston, Denise A.; Banyard, Ashley C.; Goharrriz, Hooman; Wise, Emma; Breed, Andrew C.; Saturday, Greg; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Zilahi, Erika; Al-Kobaisi, Muhannad F.; Nowotny, Norbert; Mueller, Thomas; Fooks, Anthony R.

In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, Vol. 9, No. 3, e0003569, 26.03.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Horton, DL, McElhinney, LM, Freuling, CM, Marston, DA, Banyard, AC, Goharrriz, H, Wise, E, Breed, AC, Saturday, G, Kolodziejek, J, Zilahi, E, Al-Kobaisi, MF, Nowotny, N, Mueller, T & Fooks, AR 2015, 'Complex Epidemiology of a Zoonotic Disease in a Culturally Diverse Region: Phylogeography of Rabies Virus in the Middle East', PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, vol. 9, no. 3, e0003569. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0003569
Horton, Daniel L. ; McElhinney, Lorraine M. ; Freuling, Conrad M. ; Marston, Denise A. ; Banyard, Ashley C. ; Goharrriz, Hooman ; Wise, Emma ; Breed, Andrew C. ; Saturday, Greg ; Kolodziejek, Jolanta ; Zilahi, Erika ; Al-Kobaisi, Muhannad F. ; Nowotny, Norbert ; Mueller, Thomas ; Fooks, Anthony R. / Complex Epidemiology of a Zoonotic Disease in a Culturally Diverse Region : Phylogeography of Rabies Virus in the Middle East. In: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. 2015 ; Vol. 9, No. 3.
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