Biomonitoring marine habitats in reference to antibiotic resistant bacteria and ampicillin resistance determinants from oviductal fluid of the nesting green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas

S. N. Al-Bahry, M. A. Al-Zadjali, I. Y. Mahmoud, A. E. Elshafie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the egg-laying process, oviductal fluid was collected using a non-invasive procedure from the cloacal vent of the green turtles. Forty-two independent isolates of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from 11 genera were obtained from 20 turtles during nesting. The dominant isolate was Citrobacter (52.4%), followed by Pseudomonas, Proteus, Enterobacter, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Shigella, Edwardsiella, Morganella, Providencia and Arcomobacter. Most of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin. Ampicillin-resistant isolates showed variations in their resistance for the following classes of β-lactamases: extended-spectrum β-lactamases (EBSLs), AmpC type β-lactamases C (AmpC), and screen-positive β-lactamase. None of the isolates produced metallo β-lactamase. Some ampicillin-resistant genes were detected by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) only. Inhibitor based test (IBT) categorized some isolates as AmpC β-lactamase producers. β-Lactamase genes were detected from a few strains. The sequencing of those genes revealed the presence of cephamycinase (CMY) and AmpC β-lactamases. The oviductal fluid was used in this study as a source of bacterial antibiotic-resistant determinants for biomonitoring marine turtles exposed to contaminated effluents. This data can be of value in understanding the decline of this endangered species as a result of exposure to marine pollution which is threatening their survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1308-1315
Number of pages8
JournalChemosphere
Volume87
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Ocean habitats
Ampicillin Resistance
Turtles
Environmental Monitoring
Antibiotics
biomonitoring
Ampicillin
turtle
antibiotics
Ecosystem
Bacteria
Genes
Anti-Bacterial Agents
bacterium
Edwardsiella
Fluids
fluid
gene
Morganella
habitat

Keywords

  • Ampicillin resistance
  • Bacteria
  • Biomonitoring
  • Green turtles
  • Oviductal fluid
  • Pollution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

@article{357e7f5641ce4168b6da5c8594965f00,
title = "Biomonitoring marine habitats in reference to antibiotic resistant bacteria and ampicillin resistance determinants from oviductal fluid of the nesting green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas",
abstract = "During the egg-laying process, oviductal fluid was collected using a non-invasive procedure from the cloacal vent of the green turtles. Forty-two independent isolates of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from 11 genera were obtained from 20 turtles during nesting. The dominant isolate was Citrobacter (52.4{\%}), followed by Pseudomonas, Proteus, Enterobacter, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Shigella, Edwardsiella, Morganella, Providencia and Arcomobacter. Most of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin. Ampicillin-resistant isolates showed variations in their resistance for the following classes of β-lactamases: extended-spectrum β-lactamases (EBSLs), AmpC type β-lactamases C (AmpC), and screen-positive β-lactamase. None of the isolates produced metallo β-lactamase. Some ampicillin-resistant genes were detected by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) only. Inhibitor based test (IBT) categorized some isolates as AmpC β-lactamase producers. β-Lactamase genes were detected from a few strains. The sequencing of those genes revealed the presence of cephamycinase (CMY) and AmpC β-lactamases. The oviductal fluid was used in this study as a source of bacterial antibiotic-resistant determinants for biomonitoring marine turtles exposed to contaminated effluents. This data can be of value in understanding the decline of this endangered species as a result of exposure to marine pollution which is threatening their survival.",
keywords = "Ampicillin resistance, Bacteria, Biomonitoring, Green turtles, Oviductal fluid, Pollution",
author = "Al-Bahry, {S. N.} and Al-Zadjali, {M. A.} and Mahmoud, {I. Y.} and Elshafie, {A. E.}",
year = "2012",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.chemosphere.2012.01.051",
language = "English",
volume = "87",
pages = "1308--1315",
journal = "Chemosphere",
issn = "0045-6535",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biomonitoring marine habitats in reference to antibiotic resistant bacteria and ampicillin resistance determinants from oviductal fluid of the nesting green sea turtle, Chelonia mydas

AU - Al-Bahry, S. N.

AU - Al-Zadjali, M. A.

AU - Mahmoud, I. Y.

AU - Elshafie, A. E.

PY - 2012/6

Y1 - 2012/6

N2 - During the egg-laying process, oviductal fluid was collected using a non-invasive procedure from the cloacal vent of the green turtles. Forty-two independent isolates of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from 11 genera were obtained from 20 turtles during nesting. The dominant isolate was Citrobacter (52.4%), followed by Pseudomonas, Proteus, Enterobacter, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Shigella, Edwardsiella, Morganella, Providencia and Arcomobacter. Most of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin. Ampicillin-resistant isolates showed variations in their resistance for the following classes of β-lactamases: extended-spectrum β-lactamases (EBSLs), AmpC type β-lactamases C (AmpC), and screen-positive β-lactamase. None of the isolates produced metallo β-lactamase. Some ampicillin-resistant genes were detected by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) only. Inhibitor based test (IBT) categorized some isolates as AmpC β-lactamase producers. β-Lactamase genes were detected from a few strains. The sequencing of those genes revealed the presence of cephamycinase (CMY) and AmpC β-lactamases. The oviductal fluid was used in this study as a source of bacterial antibiotic-resistant determinants for biomonitoring marine turtles exposed to contaminated effluents. This data can be of value in understanding the decline of this endangered species as a result of exposure to marine pollution which is threatening their survival.

AB - During the egg-laying process, oviductal fluid was collected using a non-invasive procedure from the cloacal vent of the green turtles. Forty-two independent isolates of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from 11 genera were obtained from 20 turtles during nesting. The dominant isolate was Citrobacter (52.4%), followed by Pseudomonas, Proteus, Enterobacter, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Shigella, Edwardsiella, Morganella, Providencia and Arcomobacter. Most of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin. Ampicillin-resistant isolates showed variations in their resistance for the following classes of β-lactamases: extended-spectrum β-lactamases (EBSLs), AmpC type β-lactamases C (AmpC), and screen-positive β-lactamase. None of the isolates produced metallo β-lactamase. Some ampicillin-resistant genes were detected by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) only. Inhibitor based test (IBT) categorized some isolates as AmpC β-lactamase producers. β-Lactamase genes were detected from a few strains. The sequencing of those genes revealed the presence of cephamycinase (CMY) and AmpC β-lactamases. The oviductal fluid was used in this study as a source of bacterial antibiotic-resistant determinants for biomonitoring marine turtles exposed to contaminated effluents. This data can be of value in understanding the decline of this endangered species as a result of exposure to marine pollution which is threatening their survival.

KW - Ampicillin resistance

KW - Bacteria

KW - Biomonitoring

KW - Green turtles

KW - Oviductal fluid

KW - Pollution

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84859507433&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84859507433&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2012.01.051

DO - 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2012.01.051

M3 - Article

VL - 87

SP - 1308

EP - 1315

JO - Chemosphere

JF - Chemosphere

SN - 0045-6535

IS - 11

ER -