Auditory function in vestibular migraine

John Mathew, Ramanathan Chandrasekharan, Ann Augustine, Anjali Lepcha, Achamma Balraj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM) is a vestibular syndrome seen in patients with migraine and is characterized by short spells of spontaneous or positional vertigo which lasts between a few seconds to weeks. Migraine and VM are considered to be a result of chemical abnormalities in the serotonin pathway. Neuhauser′s diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine is widely accepted. Research on VM is still limited and there are few studies which have been published on this topic. Materials and Methods: This study has two parts. In the first part, we did a retrospective chart review of eighty consecutive patients who were diagnosed with vestibular migraine and determined the frequency of auditory dysfunction in these patients. The second part was a prospective case control study in which we compared the audiological parameters of thirty patients diagnosed with VM with thirty normal controls to look for any significant differences. Results: The frequency of vestibular migraine in our population is 22%. The frequency of hearing loss in VM is 33%. Conclusion: There is a significant difference between cases and controls with regards to the presence of distortion product otoacoustic emissions in both ears. This finding suggests that the hearing loss in VM is cochlear in origin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268-274
Number of pages7
JournalIndian Journal of Otology
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

Migraine Disorders
Hearing Loss
Cochlea
Vertigo
Ear
Case-Control Studies
Serotonin

Keywords

  • Auditory function
  • Otoacoustic emission
  • Vestibular Migraine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Mathew, J., Chandrasekharan, R., Augustine, A., Lepcha, A., & Balraj, A. (2016). Auditory function in vestibular migraine. Indian Journal of Otology, 22(4), 268-274. https://doi.org/10.4103/0971-7749.192177

Auditory function in vestibular migraine. / Mathew, John; Chandrasekharan, Ramanathan; Augustine, Ann; Lepcha, Anjali; Balraj, Achamma.

In: Indian Journal of Otology, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.10.2016, p. 268-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mathew, J, Chandrasekharan, R, Augustine, A, Lepcha, A & Balraj, A 2016, 'Auditory function in vestibular migraine', Indian Journal of Otology, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 268-274. https://doi.org/10.4103/0971-7749.192177
Mathew J, Chandrasekharan R, Augustine A, Lepcha A, Balraj A. Auditory function in vestibular migraine. Indian Journal of Otology. 2016 Oct 1;22(4):268-274. https://doi.org/10.4103/0971-7749.192177
Mathew, John ; Chandrasekharan, Ramanathan ; Augustine, Ann ; Lepcha, Anjali ; Balraj, Achamma. / Auditory function in vestibular migraine. In: Indian Journal of Otology. 2016 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 268-274.
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