Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in the developing world

Experience from a center in India

M. Chandy, A. Srivastava, D. Dennison, V. Mathews, B. George

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We describe our experience of setting up an allogeneic BMT program at the Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore over a period of 13 years, from October 1986 to December 1999. Two hundred and twenty-one transplants were performed during this period in 214 patients, with seven patients undergoing second transplants. Indication for BMT were thalassemia major - 106 (48%), CML - 30, AML - 35, ALL - 10, SAA - 22, MDS - six and six for other miscellaneous disorders. The mean age of this patient cohort was 15.6 years (range 2-52). Graft-versus-host disease of grades III and IV was seen in 36 patients (17%) and this was the primary cause of death in 20 patients (9.2%). All patients and donors were CMV IgG positive. Sepsis was the primary cause of death in 16 patients (7.4%), 10 bacterial, four fungal and two viral. One hundred and ten of this series of patients are alive and disease free (50%) with a median follow-up of 24 months (range 2-116). These results are comparable to those achieved for patients with similar disease status in transplant units in the Western world and cost a mean of US$15 000.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)785-790
Number of pages6
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume27
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Homologous Transplantation
Bone Marrow Transplantation
India
Transplants
Cause of Death
Western World
beta-Thalassemia
Graft vs Host Disease
Sepsis
Immunoglobulin G
Tissue Donors
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Bone marrow transplantation
  • Developing countries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in the developing world : Experience from a center in India. / Chandy, M.; Srivastava, A.; Dennison, D.; Mathews, V.; George, B.

In: Bone Marrow Transplantation, Vol. 27, No. 8, 2001, p. 785-790.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chandy, M. ; Srivastava, A. ; Dennison, D. ; Mathews, V. ; George, B. / Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in the developing world : Experience from a center in India. In: Bone Marrow Transplantation. 2001 ; Vol. 27, No. 8. pp. 785-790.
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