Abdominal tuberculosis - Experience of a University hospital in Oman

Norman Machado, Christopher S. Grant, Euan Scrimgeour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the clinical presentation and assess the usefulness of various diagnostic modalities and outcome of treatment of abdominal tuberculosis (TB). Materials and methods: The files of patients admitted to Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH) with a diagnosis of abdominal TB from January 91 to December 99 were studied retrospectively and data abstracted. Results: Eighteen patients were diagnosed during this period, of which ten were males. The median age was 27 years (range 5-65). The common symptoms were fever, weight loss, anorexia, and abdominal pain. Abdominal signs were less frequent and included hepatomegaly and ascites. Eight patients had co-existent immunocompromised disorders; two of these had active pulmonary TB. Diagnostic investigations included gastrointestinal contrast studies in two, ultrasound (US) guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in nine, and laparoscopy and/or laparotomy in seven. All patients underwent antituberculous therapy for 9-12 months, in addition to the treatment of associated disorders. The response to antituberculous therapy was good except in one patient with HIV. Four patients died from associated primary disorders. Conclusions: The clinical presentation was non-specific and nearly half of the patients had associated immunocompromised disorders; thus a high index of clinical suspicion is required. US guided FNAC and selective laparoscopy were the most useful diagnostic modalities. Antituberculous therapy was effective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-190
Number of pages4
JournalActa Tropica
Volume80
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 22 2001

Fingerprint

Oman
tuberculosis
Tuberculosis
laparoscopy
Fine Needle Biopsy
cell biology
Laparoscopy
therapeutics
Cell Biology
Hepatomegaly
laparotomy
ascites
Anorexia
Therapeutics
anorexia
Pulmonary Tuberculosis
Ascites
Laparotomy
Abdominal Pain
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)

Keywords

  • Abdominal tuberculosis
  • Immunocompromised disorders
  • Laparoscopy
  • Ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Abdominal tuberculosis - Experience of a University hospital in Oman. / Machado, Norman; Grant, Christopher S.; Scrimgeour, Euan.

In: Acta Tropica, Vol. 80, No. 2, 22.10.2001, p. 187-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Machado, Norman ; Grant, Christopher S. ; Scrimgeour, Euan. / Abdominal tuberculosis - Experience of a University hospital in Oman. In: Acta Tropica. 2001 ; Vol. 80, No. 2. pp. 187-190.
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