A study of prevalence of anaemia in adolescent girls and reproductive-age women in Kuala Lumpur

Mei Ciu Chang, Bee Koon Poh*, Janice June, Norsakira Jefrydin, Srijit Das

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Anaemia is a common disorder of the haemopoietic system commonly found in the developing countries. The present study was undertaken to highlight the prevalence of anaemia in healthy adolescent girls and a reproductive-age group of adult women residing in an urban area. Material and methods: A total of 441 individuals comprising healthy, non-pregnant, non-lactating, reproductive-age women (aged 13 to 50 years) participated in the study. Informed consent was taken and the individuals were screened for haemoglobin level. Anthropometric measurements including body weight and height were recorded. All statistical data were analyzed using the program Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Results: Mean body weight of adolescent girls (52.5±11.0 kg) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than adult women (57.7±13.4 kg). Based on the body mass index (BMI) classification of the World Health Organization, the majority of adolescents (77.4%) and adults (50.7%) were classified as normal. Only a small proportion of adolescents (2.2%) and adults (16.1%) were classified as underweight. Mean value for haemoglobin of adolescents (12.6±0.9 g/dl) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than adults (12.1±1.3 g/dl). Prevalence of anaemia amongst adults (41.7%) was higher than adolescents (28.3%). Nutrient intake of anaemic adolescents was lower than non-anaemic adolescents. Conclusions: The results highlight the prevalence of anaemia in adolescent girls and reproductive-age women which may be helpful in combating this common disorder in the urban population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-68
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Medical Science
Volume5
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Anaemia
  • Health
  • Reproductive-age

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this