Why verbless sentences in Standard Arabic are verbless

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article aims to account for why verbless sentences in Standard Arabic lack a copular verb. In contrast to previous accounts which attribute the absence of the copula to some defect of present tense, I claim that a verbless sentence does not take a copula because its nominals do not need structural Case. The proposed analysis argues that structural Case is licensed by a "Verbal Case" feature on the relevant Case-checking heads, and assumes the Visibility Condition. The present analysis is based on a unique interaction between tense and word order, and on the observation that verbless sentences are finite clauses composed of a topic and a predicate, as well as on the observation that they do not involve licensing of structural Case.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-30
Number of pages30
JournalCanadian Journal of Linguistics
Volume57
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

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lack
interaction
Copula
Visibility
Tense
Finite Clause
Present Tense
Nominals
Defects
Interaction
Licensing
Copular Verbs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Why verbless sentences in Standard Arabic are verbless. / Al-Balushi, Rashid.

In: Canadian Journal of Linguistics, Vol. 57, No. 1, 03.2012, p. 1-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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