Use of prescription drugs and investigations by doctors in primary care settings in Oman and the UK

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This audit aimed to investigate the use of prescription drugs and investigations by trainee doctors in primary care settings in Oman and the UK. Methods: This audit took place between February and April 2015. The medical records of consecutive patients seen by five family medicine trainee doctors at a primary care setting in Oman were retrospectively reviewed. These data were compared to those gathered from two trainees at a general practice clinic in the UK as well as an experienced general practitioner (GP) who had practiced in both countries. Results: The average number of items prescribed per patient was 1.19, 0.43 and 0.24 and the rate of investigations was 20%, 21% and 11% for Omani trainees, UK trainees and the GP, respectively. Conclusion: This audit suggests that family medicine trainees in Oman prescribe almost three times as many drugs as trainees in the UK. The findings also point towards an over-investigation of the relatively young Omani patient population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e487-e490
JournalSultan Qaboos University Medical Journal
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

Oman
Prescription Drugs
Primary Health Care
General Practitioners
Medicine
General Practice
Medical Records
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population

Keywords

  • Health resources
  • Oman
  • Prescriptions
  • Primary health care
  • United Kingdom

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Use of prescription drugs and investigations by doctors in primary care settings in Oman and the UK. / Davidson, Robin.

In: Sultan Qaboos University Medical Journal, Vol. 16, No. 4, 01.11.2016, p. e487-e490.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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