Understanding the influenza a H1N1 2009 pandemic

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A new strain of Influenza A virus, with quadruple segment translocation in its RNA, caused an outbreak of human infection in April 2009 in USA and Mexico. It was classified as Influenza A H1N1 2009. The genetic material originates from three different species: human, avian and swine. By June 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) had classified this strain as a pandemic virus, making it the first pandemic in 40 years. Influenza A H1N1 2009 is transmitted by respiratory droplets; the transmissibility of this strain is higher than other influenza strains which made infection control difficult. The majority of cases of H1N1 2009 were mild and self limiting, but some people developed complications and others died. Most laboratory tests are insensitive except the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) which is expensive and labour intensive. The Influenza A H1N1 2009 virus is sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir), but some isolates resistant to oseltamivir have been reported. A vaccine against the new pandemic strain was available by mid-September 2009 with very good immunogenicity and safety profile. Surveillance is very important at all stages of any pandemic to detect and monitor the trend of viral infections and to prevent the occurrence of future pandemics. The aim of this review is to understand pandemic influenza viruses, and what strategies can be used for surveillance, mitigation and control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-195
Number of pages9
JournalSultan Qaboos University Medical Journal
Volume10
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2010

Fingerprint

Pandemics
Human Influenza
Oseltamivir
Zanamivir
H1N1 Subtype Influenza A Virus
Influenza A virus
Neuraminidase
Virus Diseases
Infection Control
Mexico
Orthomyxoviridae
Disease Outbreaks
Swine
Vaccines
RNA
Viruses
Safety
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Infection
Genes

Keywords

  • Influenza
  • Pandemic
  • Polymerase chain reaction
  • Surveillance
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Understanding the influenza a H1N1 2009 pandemic. / Al-Muharrmi, Zakariya.

In: Sultan Qaboos University Medical Journal, Vol. 10, No. 2, 01.08.2010, p. 187-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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