The adequacy of informed consent forms in genetic research in oman: A pilot study

Asya Al-Riyami, Deepali Jaju, Sanjay Jaju, Henry J. Silverman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genetic research presents ethical challenges to the achievement of valid informed consent, especially in developing countries with areas of low literacy. During the last several years, a number of genetic research proposals involving Omani nationals were submitted to the Department of Research and Studies, Ministry of Health, Oman. The objective of this paper is to report on the results of an internal quality assurance initiative to determine the extent of the information being provided in genetic research informed consent forms. In order to achieve this, we developed checklists to assess the inclusion of basic elements of informed consent as well as elements related to the collection and future storage of biological samples. Three of the authors independently evaluated and reached consensus on seven informed consent forms that were available for review. Of the seven consent forms, four had less than half of the basic elements of informed consent. None contained any information regarding whether genetic information relevant to health would be disclosed, whether participants may share in commercial products, the extent of confidentiality protections, and the inclusion of additional consent forms for future storage and use of tissue samples. Information regarding genetic risks and withdrawal of samples were rarely mentioned (1/7), whereas limits on future use of samples were mentioned in 3 of 7 consent forms. Ultimately, consent forms are not likely to address key issues regarding genetic research that have been recommended by research ethics guidelines. We recommend enhanced educational efforts to increase awareness, on the part of researchers, of information that should be included in consent forms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)57-62
Number of pages6
JournalDeveloping World Bioethics
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

Fingerprint

Oman
Consent Forms
genetic research
Genetic Research
Informed Consent
inclusion
research ethics
health
quality assurance
Research Ethics
withdrawal
ministry
Confidentiality
Health
literacy
developing country
Checklist
Developing Countries
Consensus
Research Design

Keywords

  • Genetic research
  • Informed consent
  • Oman
  • Research ethics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Issues, ethics and legal aspects
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

The adequacy of informed consent forms in genetic research in oman : A pilot study. / Al-Riyami, Asya; Jaju, Deepali; Jaju, Sanjay; Silverman, Henry J.

In: Developing World Bioethics, Vol. 11, No. 2, 08.2011, p. 57-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al-Riyami, Asya ; Jaju, Deepali ; Jaju, Sanjay ; Silverman, Henry J. / The adequacy of informed consent forms in genetic research in oman : A pilot study. In: Developing World Bioethics. 2011 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 57-62.
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