Soil quality after eight years under high tunnels

Sharon J B Knewtson, M. B. Kirkham, Rhonda R. Janke, Leigh W. Murray, Edward E. Carey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The sustainability of soil quality under high tunnels will influence management of high tunnels currently in use and grower decisions regarding design and management of new high tunnels to be constructed. Soil quality was quantified using measures of soil pH, salinity, total carbon, and particulate organic matter (POM) carbon ina silt loam soil that had been in vegetable production under high tunnels at the research station in Olathe, KS, for eight years. Soil under high tunnels was compared with that in adjacent fields in both a conventional and an organic management system. The eight-year presence of high tunnels under the conventional management system resulted in increased soil pH and salinity but did not affect soil carbon. In the organic management system, high tunnels did not affect soil pH, increased soil salinity, and influenced soil carbon (C) pools with an increase in POM carbon. The increases in soil salinity were not enough to be detrimental to crops. These results indicate that soil quality was not adversely affected by eight years under stationary high tunnels managed with conventionally or organically produced vegetable crops.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1630-1633
Number of pages4
JournalHortScience
Volume47
Issue number11
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

Fingerprint

soil quality
soil salinity
carbon
management systems
soil pH
soil
silt loam soils
vegetable growing
vegetable crops
growers
salinity
crops
particulate organic matter

Keywords

  • Hoophouse
  • Particulate organic matter carbon (POM C)
  • Salinity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Horticulture

Cite this

Knewtson, S. J. B., Kirkham, M. B., Janke, R. R., Murray, L. W., & Carey, E. E. (2012). Soil quality after eight years under high tunnels. HortScience, 47(11), 1630-1633.

Soil quality after eight years under high tunnels. / Knewtson, Sharon J B; Kirkham, M. B.; Janke, Rhonda R.; Murray, Leigh W.; Carey, Edward E.

In: HortScience, Vol. 47, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 1630-1633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Knewtson, SJB, Kirkham, MB, Janke, RR, Murray, LW & Carey, EE 2012, 'Soil quality after eight years under high tunnels', HortScience, vol. 47, no. 11, pp. 1630-1633.
Knewtson SJB, Kirkham MB, Janke RR, Murray LW, Carey EE. Soil quality after eight years under high tunnels. HortScience. 2012 Nov;47(11):1630-1633.
Knewtson, Sharon J B ; Kirkham, M. B. ; Janke, Rhonda R. ; Murray, Leigh W. ; Carey, Edward E. / Soil quality after eight years under high tunnels. In: HortScience. 2012 ; Vol. 47, No. 11. pp. 1630-1633.
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