Slow disease progression and robust therapy-mediated CD4+ T-cell recovery are associated with efficient thymopoiesis during HIV-1 infection

Marie Lise Dion, Rebeka Bordi, Joumana Zeidan, Robert Asaad, Mohammed Rachid Boulassel, Jean Pierre Routy, Micheal M. Lederman, Rafick Pierre Sekaly, Remi Cheynier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In chronic HIV infection, most untreated patients lose naive CD4 + and CD8+ T cells, whereas a minority preserve them despite persistent high viremia. Although antiretroviral therapy (ART)-mediated viral suppression generally results in a rise of naive and total CD4+ T cells, certain patients experience very little or no T-cell reconstitution. High peripheral T-cell activation has been linked to poor clinical outcomes, interfering with previous evaluations of thymic function in disease progression and therapy-mediated T-cell recovery. To circumvent this, we used the sj/βTREC ratio, a robust index of thymopoiesis that is independent of peripheral T-cell proliferation, to evaluate the thymic contribution to the preservation and restoration of naive CD4+ T cells. We show that the loss of naive and total CD4+ T cells is the result of or is exacerbated by a sustained thymic defect, whereas efficient thymopoiesis supports naive and total CD4+ T-cell maintenance in slow progressor patients. In ART-treated patients, CD4+ T-cell recovery was associated with the normalization of thymopoiesis, whereas the thymic defect persisted in aviremic patients who failed to recover CD4+ T-cell counts. Overall, we demonstrate that efficient thymopoiesis is key in the natural maintenance and in therapymediated recovery of naive and total CD4 + T cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2912-2920
Number of pages9
JournalBlood
Volume109
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2007

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T-cells
HIV Infections
Disease Progression
HIV-1
T-Lymphocytes
Recovery
Therapeutics
Maintenance
Defects
Viremia
Cell proliferation
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Restoration
Chemical activation
Cell Proliferation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Biochemistry
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Slow disease progression and robust therapy-mediated CD4+ T-cell recovery are associated with efficient thymopoiesis during HIV-1 infection. / Dion, Marie Lise; Bordi, Rebeka; Zeidan, Joumana; Asaad, Robert; Boulassel, Mohammed Rachid; Routy, Jean Pierre; Lederman, Micheal M.; Sekaly, Rafick Pierre; Cheynier, Remi.

In: Blood, Vol. 109, No. 7, 01.04.2007, p. 2912-2920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dion, Marie Lise ; Bordi, Rebeka ; Zeidan, Joumana ; Asaad, Robert ; Boulassel, Mohammed Rachid ; Routy, Jean Pierre ; Lederman, Micheal M. ; Sekaly, Rafick Pierre ; Cheynier, Remi. / Slow disease progression and robust therapy-mediated CD4+ T-cell recovery are associated with efficient thymopoiesis during HIV-1 infection. In: Blood. 2007 ; Vol. 109, No. 7. pp. 2912-2920.
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