Simvastatin and vitamin e effects on cardiac and hepatic oxidative stress in rats fed on high fat diet

Amr M. Abbas, Hussein F. Sakr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High fat diet (HFD) is a common cause of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Published data showed that HFD and subsequent dyslipidemia are major triggers for oxidative stress. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 170-200 g, were divided into six groups: control, control with vitamin E (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.), control with simvastatin (SIM) (10 mg/kg of body weight/day), HFD, HFD with vitamin E, and HFD with SIM. Standard and high cholesterol diets were given for 15 weeks and SIM and vitamin E were added in the last 4 weeks. In all rats, serum vitamin E, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low (LDL) and high (HDL) density lipoproteins, alanine (ALT) and aspartate (AST) transaminases, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) as well as cardiac and hepatic thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and antioxidants (reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT)) were measured. Also, electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded. HFD significantly increased QTc interval, heart rate (HR), serum TC, TG, LDL, ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, liver TG, and cardiac and hepatic TBARS but decreased antioxidants and HDL, while SIM decreased HR, liver TG, serum TC, TG, and LDL and increased HDL in HFD rats. Vitamin E had no effect. Moreover, SIM and vitamin E decreased QTc interval, serum ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, and cardiac and hepatic TBARS and increased antioxidants in HFD rats. Histopathological observations confirm the biochemical parameters. SIM and vitamin E slow progression of hypercholesterolemia-induced oxidative stress in liver and heart and improve their functions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)737-750
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Physiology and Biochemistry
Volume69
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

Fingerprint

Oxidative stress
Simvastatin
High Fat Diet
Nutrition
Vitamins
Vitamin E
Rats
Oxidative Stress
Fats
Liver
Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances
gamma-Glutamyltransferase
Alkaline Phosphatase
Cholesterol
Antioxidants
Triglycerides
HDL Lipoproteins
Serum
Aspartic Acid
LDL Cholesterol

Keywords

  • Heart
  • Hypercholesterolemia
  • Keyword: Simvastatin
  • Liver
  • Oxidative stress
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Simvastatin and vitamin e effects on cardiac and hepatic oxidative stress in rats fed on high fat diet. / Abbas, Amr M.; Sakr, Hussein F.

In: Journal of Physiology and Biochemistry, Vol. 69, No. 4, 12.2013, p. 737-750.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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