Shining a light on task-shifting policy

Exploring opportunities for adaptability in non-communicable disease management programmes in Uganda

Godfrey Katende, Mary Donnelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In terms of disease burden, many low-and middle-income countries are currently experiencing a transition from infectious to chronic diseases. In Uganda, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have increased significantly in recent years; this challenge is compounded by the healthcare worker shortage and the underfunded health system administration. Addressing the growing prevalence of NCDs requires evidence-based policies and strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality rates; however, the integration and evaluation of new policies and processes pose many challenges. Task-shifting is the process whereby specific tasks are transferred to health workers with less training and fewer qualifications. Successful implementation of a task-shifting policy requires appropriate skill training, clearly defined roles, adequate evaluation, an enhanced training capacity and sufficient health worker incentives. This article focuses on task-shifting policy as a potentially effective strategy to address the growing burden of NCDs on the Ugandan healthcare system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e161-e167
JournalSultan Qaboos University Medical Journal
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2016

Fingerprint

Uganda
Disease Management
Health
Delivery of Health Care
Motivation
Chronic Disease
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Community health planning
  • Delivery of health care
  • Health workforce
  • Physician shortage area
  • Uganda

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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