Renewable and Nuclear Energy

an International Study of Students’ Beliefs About, and Willingness to Act, in Relation to Two Energy Production Scenarios

Keith Skamp, Eddie Boyes, Martin Stanisstreet, Manuel Rodriguez, Georgios Malandrakis, Rosanne Fortner, Ahmet Kilinc, Neil Taylor, Kiran Chhokar, Shweta Dua, Abdullah Ambusaidi, Irene Cheong, Mijung Kim, Hye Gyoung Yoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Renewable and nuclear energy are two plausible alternatives to fossil fuel-based energy production. This study reports students’ beliefs about the usefulness of these two options in reducing global warming and their willingness to undertake actions that would encourage their uptake. Using a specially designed questionnaire, students’ (n > 12,000; grades 6 to 10) responses were obtained from 11 countries. Links between their beliefs about these energy options and their willingness to act were quantified using a range of novel derived indices: significant differences between beliefs and willingness to act were found across the various counties. One derived index, the Potential Effectiveness of Education, measures the extent to which enhancing a person’s belief in the effectiveness of an action might increase their willingness to undertake that action: this indicated that education may impact willingness to act in some countries more than others. Interpretations are proffered for the reported differences between countries including whether the extent of students’ concern about global warming had impacted their decisions and whether cultural attributes had any influence. Pedagogical ways forward are related to the findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-35
Number of pages35
JournalResearch in Science Education
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jul 13 2017

Fingerprint

energy production
nuclear energy
renewable energy
act
scenario
education measure
student
school grade
energy
interpretation
human being
questionnaire
education

Keywords

  • Cultural differences
  • Environmental action
  • Environmental education
  • Global warming
  • Nuclear energy
  • Renewable energy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Renewable and Nuclear Energy : an International Study of Students’ Beliefs About, and Willingness to Act, in Relation to Two Energy Production Scenarios. / Skamp, Keith; Boyes, Eddie; Stanisstreet, Martin; Rodriguez, Manuel; Malandrakis, Georgios; Fortner, Rosanne; Kilinc, Ahmet; Taylor, Neil; Chhokar, Kiran; Dua, Shweta; Ambusaidi, Abdullah; Cheong, Irene; Kim, Mijung; Yoon, Hye Gyoung.

In: Research in Science Education, 13.07.2017, p. 1-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Skamp, K, Boyes, E, Stanisstreet, M, Rodriguez, M, Malandrakis, G, Fortner, R, Kilinc, A, Taylor, N, Chhokar, K, Dua, S, Ambusaidi, A, Cheong, I, Kim, M & Yoon, HG 2017, 'Renewable and Nuclear Energy: an International Study of Students’ Beliefs About, and Willingness to Act, in Relation to Two Energy Production Scenarios', Research in Science Education, pp. 1-35. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11165-017-9622-6
Skamp, Keith ; Boyes, Eddie ; Stanisstreet, Martin ; Rodriguez, Manuel ; Malandrakis, Georgios ; Fortner, Rosanne ; Kilinc, Ahmet ; Taylor, Neil ; Chhokar, Kiran ; Dua, Shweta ; Ambusaidi, Abdullah ; Cheong, Irene ; Kim, Mijung ; Yoon, Hye Gyoung. / Renewable and Nuclear Energy : an International Study of Students’ Beliefs About, and Willingness to Act, in Relation to Two Energy Production Scenarios. In: Research in Science Education. 2017 ; pp. 1-35.
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