Relationship between repeated sprint performance and both aerobic and anaerobic fitness

Wajdi Dardouri, Mohamed Amin Selmi, Radhouane Haj Sassi, Zied Gharbi, Ahmed Rebhi, Mohamed Haj Yahmed, Wassim Moalla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aims of this study were firstly, to examine the relationship between repeated sprint performance indices and anaerobic speed reserve (AnSR), aerobic fitness and anaerobic power and secondly, to identify the best predictors of sprinting ability among these parameters. Twenty nine subjects (age: 22.5 ± 1.6 years, body height: 1.8 ± 0.1 m, body mass: 68.8 ± 8.5 kg, body mass index (BMI): 22.2 ± 2.1 kgm-2, fat mass: 11.3 ± 2.9 %) participated in this study. All participants performed a 30 m sprint test (T30) from which we calculated the maximal anaerobic speed (MAnS), vertical and horizontal jumps, 20m multi-stage shuttle run test (MSRT) and repeated sprint test (10 x 15 m shuttle run). AnSR was calculated as the difference between MAnS and the maximal speed reached in the MSRT. Blood lactate sampling was performed 3 min after the RSA protocol. There was no significant correlation between repeated sprint indices (total time (TT); peak time (PT), fatigue index (FI)) and both estimated VO2max and vertical jump performance). TT and PT were significantly correlated with T30 (r=0.63, p=0.001 and r=0.62, p=0.001; respectively), horizontal jump performance (r = -0.47, p = 0.001 and r = -0.49, p = 0.006; respectively) and AnSR (r=-0.68, p= 0.001 and r=-0.70, p=0.001, respectively). Significant correlations were found between blood lactate concentration and TT, PT, and AnSR (r=-0.44, p=0.017; r=-0.43, p=0.018 and r=0.44, p=0.016; respectively). Stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that AnSR was the only significant predictor of the TT and PT, explaining 47% and 50% of the shared variance, respectively. Our findings are of particular interest for coaches and fitness trainers in order to predict repeated sprint performance by using AnSR that can easily identify the respective upper performance limits supported by aerobic and anaerobic power of a player involved in multi-sprint team sports.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)139-148
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Human Kinetics
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014

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Lactic Acid
Body Height
Sports
Fatigue
Body Mass Index
Fats
Regression Analysis
Mentoring

Keywords

  • Aerobic fitness
  • Anaerobic power
  • Horizontal jump
  • Repeated sprint ability
  • Vertical jump

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Relationship between repeated sprint performance and both aerobic and anaerobic fitness. / Dardouri, Wajdi; Selmi, Mohamed Amin; Sassi, Radhouane Haj; Gharbi, Zied; Rebhi, Ahmed; Yahmed, Mohamed Haj; Moalla, Wassim.

In: Journal of Human Kinetics, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 139-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dardouri, W, Selmi, MA, Sassi, RH, Gharbi, Z, Rebhi, A, Yahmed, MH & Moalla, W 2014, 'Relationship between repeated sprint performance and both aerobic and anaerobic fitness', Journal of Human Kinetics, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 139-148. https://doi.org/10.2478/hukin-2014-0016
Dardouri, Wajdi ; Selmi, Mohamed Amin ; Sassi, Radhouane Haj ; Gharbi, Zied ; Rebhi, Ahmed ; Yahmed, Mohamed Haj ; Moalla, Wassim. / Relationship between repeated sprint performance and both aerobic and anaerobic fitness. In: Journal of Human Kinetics. 2014 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 139-148.
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