Prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) as a marker of residual cardiovascular risk among acute coronary syndrome patients from Oman

Ibrahim Al-Zakwani, Kadhim Sulaiman, Khalid Al-Rasadi, Dimitri P. Mikhailidis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To estimate the prevalence as well as predictors of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients in Oman. Methods: Data were analyzed from the records of 1583 consecutive patients admitted with a diagnosis of ACS as part of the Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE). A low HDL-C was considered as 2 mg/dL), triglycerides, and body mass index (BMI) were positive predictors of low HDL-C. However, male gender, total cholesterol, and heart failure (Killip class score ≥3) were negative predictors of low HDL-C. Conclusions: Omani ACS patients have a high prevalence of low HDL-C. Renal impairment, triglycerides, and BMI were positive predictors of low HDL-C. The clinical relevance of a low HDL-C abnormality needs to be evaluated in light of the study's limitations (e.g., cross sectional study design as well as the effects of the acute phase reaction and treatment).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)879-885
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Medical Research and Opinion
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Oman
Acute Coronary Syndrome
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Acute-Phase Reaction
Registries
Heart Failure
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cholesterol
Kidney
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • High density lipoprotein cholesterol
  • Low density lipoprotein cholesterol
  • Oman
  • Triglycerides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) as a marker of residual cardiovascular risk among acute coronary syndrome patients from Oman",
abstract = "Objective: To estimate the prevalence as well as predictors of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients in Oman. Methods: Data were analyzed from the records of 1583 consecutive patients admitted with a diagnosis of ACS as part of the Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE). A low HDL-C was considered as 2 mg/dL), triglycerides, and body mass index (BMI) were positive predictors of low HDL-C. However, male gender, total cholesterol, and heart failure (Killip class score ≥3) were negative predictors of low HDL-C. Conclusions: Omani ACS patients have a high prevalence of low HDL-C. Renal impairment, triglycerides, and BMI were positive predictors of low HDL-C. The clinical relevance of a low HDL-C abnormality needs to be evaluated in light of the study's limitations (e.g., cross sectional study design as well as the effects of the acute phase reaction and treatment).",
keywords = "Acute coronary syndrome, High density lipoprotein cholesterol, Low density lipoprotein cholesterol, Oman, Triglycerides",
author = "Ibrahim Al-Zakwani and Kadhim Sulaiman and Khalid Al-Rasadi and Mikhailidis, {Dimitri P.}",
year = "2011",
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language = "English",
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T1 - Prevalence of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) as a marker of residual cardiovascular risk among acute coronary syndrome patients from Oman

AU - Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim

AU - Sulaiman, Kadhim

AU - Al-Rasadi, Khalid

AU - Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.

PY - 2011/4

Y1 - 2011/4

N2 - Objective: To estimate the prevalence as well as predictors of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients in Oman. Methods: Data were analyzed from the records of 1583 consecutive patients admitted with a diagnosis of ACS as part of the Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE). A low HDL-C was considered as 2 mg/dL), triglycerides, and body mass index (BMI) were positive predictors of low HDL-C. However, male gender, total cholesterol, and heart failure (Killip class score ≥3) were negative predictors of low HDL-C. Conclusions: Omani ACS patients have a high prevalence of low HDL-C. Renal impairment, triglycerides, and BMI were positive predictors of low HDL-C. The clinical relevance of a low HDL-C abnormality needs to be evaluated in light of the study's limitations (e.g., cross sectional study design as well as the effects of the acute phase reaction and treatment).

AB - Objective: To estimate the prevalence as well as predictors of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients in Oman. Methods: Data were analyzed from the records of 1583 consecutive patients admitted with a diagnosis of ACS as part of the Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events (Gulf RACE). A low HDL-C was considered as 2 mg/dL), triglycerides, and body mass index (BMI) were positive predictors of low HDL-C. However, male gender, total cholesterol, and heart failure (Killip class score ≥3) were negative predictors of low HDL-C. Conclusions: Omani ACS patients have a high prevalence of low HDL-C. Renal impairment, triglycerides, and BMI were positive predictors of low HDL-C. The clinical relevance of a low HDL-C abnormality needs to be evaluated in light of the study's limitations (e.g., cross sectional study design as well as the effects of the acute phase reaction and treatment).

KW - Acute coronary syndrome

KW - High density lipoprotein cholesterol

KW - Low density lipoprotein cholesterol

KW - Oman

KW - Triglycerides

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