Personality of young drivers in Oman

Relationship to risky driving behaviors and crash involvement among Sultan Qaboos University students

Mohammed Al Azri, Hamed Al Reesi, Samir Al-Adawi, Abdullah Al Maniri, James Freeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Drivers’ behaviors such as violations and errors have been demonstrated to predict crash involvement among young Omani drivers. However, there is a dearth of studies linking risky driving behaviors to the personality of young drivers. The aim of the present study was to assess such traits within a sample of young Omani drivers (as measured through the behavioral inhibition system [BIS] and the behavioral activation system [BAS]) and determine links with aberrant driving behaviors and self-reported crash involvement. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Sultan Qaboos University that targeted all licensed Omani's undergraduate students. A total of 529 randomly selected students completed the self-reported questionnaire that included an assessment of driving behaviors (e.g., Driver Behaviour Questionnaire, DBQ) as well as the BIS/BAS measures. Results: A total of 237 participants (44.8%) reported involvement in at least one crash since being licensed. Young drivers with lower BIS–Anxiety scores and higher BAS–Fun Seeking tendencies as well as male drivers were more likely to report driving violations. Statistically significant gender differences were observed on all BIS and BAS subscales (except for BAS–Fun) and the DBQ subscales, because males reported higher trait scores. Though personality traits were related to aberrant driving behaviors at the bivariate level, the constructs were not predictive of engaging in violations or errors. Furthermore, consistent with previous research, a supplementary multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only driving experience was predictive of crash involvement. Conclusions: The findings highlight that though personality traits influence self-reported driving styles (and differ between the genders), the relationship with crash involvement is not as clear. This article further outlines the key findings of the study in regards to understanding core psychological constructs that increase crash risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150-156
Number of pages7
JournalTraffic Injury Prevention
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 17 2017

Fingerprint

Oman
traffic behavior
Personality
personality
Chemical activation
driver
Students
student
activation
Regression analysis
Logistics
personality traits
questionnaire
Sultan
cross-sectional study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
gender-specific factors
Regression Analysis
regression analysis

Keywords

  • BIS/BAS
  • crash involvement
  • Oman
  • risky driving behavior
  • young drivers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety Research
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Personality of young drivers in Oman : Relationship to risky driving behaviors and crash involvement among Sultan Qaboos University students. / Al Azri, Mohammed; Al Reesi, Hamed; Al-Adawi, Samir; Al Maniri, Abdullah; Freeman, James.

In: Traffic Injury Prevention, Vol. 18, No. 2, 17.02.2017, p. 150-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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