Pattern and determinants of birth weight in Oman

M. M. Islam, M. K. ElSayed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyse the pattern of birth weight (BW) and identify the factors affecting BW and the risk factors of low birth weight (LBW) in Oman. Study design: The data for the study came from the 2000 Oman National Health Survey conducted by the Ministry of Health. The survey covered a nationally representative sample of 2037 ever married Omani women of reproductive age. Methods: Data on birth weight were gathered from health cards of the infants born within five years before the survey date. The study considered 977 singleton live births for whom data on birth weights were available. LBW was defined as BW less than 2500 g. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, multivariate linear regression and logistic regression models were used for data analysis. Results: The mean BW was found to be 3.09 (SD 0.51) kg. BW was found to be significantly lower among the infants with the following characteristics: born in Ad-Dhakhliyah region, born in rural areas, and whose mothers had low economic status, low parity (0-2), and late initiation of antenatal care (ANC) visit. The incidence of LBW was found to be 9% in Oman in 2000. Mother's education, economic status, region of residence, late initiation of first ANC visit and experience of pregnancy complications appeared as the significant determinants of LBW in Oman. In contrast to most other studies, this study demonstrates that mothers with an advanced level of education (secondary and above) are more likely to have infants with LBW in Oman. Conclusion: The study findings highlight the need of intervention for specific groups of women with higher risk of adverse BW outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1618-1626
Number of pages9
JournalPublic Health
Volume129
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

Oman
Birth Weight
Low Birth Weight Infant
Prenatal Care
Mothers
Logistic Models
Economics
Education
Pregnancy Complications
Live Birth
Parity
Health Surveys
Linear Models
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • Birth weight
  • Consanguineous
  • Incidence
  • Low birth weight
  • Oman
  • Risk factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Pattern and determinants of birth weight in Oman. / Islam, M. M.; ElSayed, M. K.

In: Public Health, Vol. 129, No. 12, 01.12.2015, p. 1618-1626.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Islam, M. M. ; ElSayed, M. K. / Pattern and determinants of birth weight in Oman. In: Public Health. 2015 ; Vol. 129, No. 12. pp. 1618-1626.
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