Oral propranolol for the treatment of periorbital infantile hemangioma

A preliminary report from Oman

Beena Harikrishna, Anuradha Ganesh, Sana Al-Zuahibi, Samia Al-Jabri, Ahmed Al-Waily, Adil Al-Riyami, Faisal Al-Azri, Feraz Masoud, Abdullah Al-Mujaini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose : To investigate the efficacy and safety of oral propranolol in the management of periorbital infantile hemangioma in four subjects. Materials and Methods : Consecutive patients who presented with periorbital capillary hemangioma with vision-threatening lesions were prospectively enrolled in this study between January 2009 and October 2010. All subjects underwent treatment with 2 mg/kg/day oral propranolol. All subjects underwent ocular, systemic, and radiologic evaluations before treatment and at periodic intervals after starting therapy. Side effects from therapy were also evaluated. Results : Four subjects, between 3 months and 19 months of age, with periorbital hemangioma were enrolled in this study. Two subjects had been previously treated with oral corticosteroids with unsatisfactory response. All subjects had severe ptosis, with the potential for deprivation amblyopia. Three subjects had orbital involvement. After hospital admission, oral propranolol was initiated in all subjects under monitoring by a pediatric cardiologist. Subsequent therapy was performed with periodic out-patient monitoring. All subjects had excellent response to treatment, with regression of periorbital and orbital hemangioma. There were no side effects from therapy. Conclusions : Oral propranolol for periorbital hemangioma was effective in all the four subjects. Oral propranolol may be appropriate for patients who are nonresponsive to intralesional or systemic steroids. In patients with significant orbital involvement and lesions causing vision-threatening complications, oral propranolol can be the primary therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)298-303
Number of pages6
JournalMiddle East African Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Oman
Hemangioma
Propranolol
Therapeutics
Capillary Hemangioma
Amblyopia
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Outpatients
Steroids
Pediatrics
Safety

Keywords

  • Amblyopia
  • Infants
  • Orbital Hemangioma
  • Propranolol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Oral propranolol for the treatment of periorbital infantile hemangioma : A preliminary report from Oman. / Harikrishna, Beena; Ganesh, Anuradha; Al-Zuahibi, Sana; Al-Jabri, Samia; Al-Waily, Ahmed; Al-Riyami, Adil; Al-Azri, Faisal; Masoud, Feraz; Al-Mujaini, Abdullah.

In: Middle East African Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 18, No. 4, 10.2011, p. 298-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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