Nursing faculty academic incivility: Perceptions of nursing students and faculty

Joshua K. Muliira, Jansi Natarajan, Jacoba Van Der Colff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Incivility in nursing education can adversely affect the academic environment, the learning outcomes, and safety. Nursing faculty (NF) and nursing students (NS) contribute to the academic incivility. Little is known about the extent of NF academic incivility in the Middle East region. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions and extent of NF academic incivility in an undergraduate nursing program of a public university in Oman. Methods: A cross sectional survey was used to collect data from 155 undergraduate NS and 40 NF about faculty academic incivility. Data was collected using the Incivility in Nursing Education Survey. Results: The majority of NS and NF had similar perceptions about disruptive faculty behaviors. The incidence of faculty incivility was low (Mean = 1.5). The disruptive behaviors with the highest incidence were arriving late for scheduled activities, leaving schedule activities early, cancelling scheduled activities without warning, ineffective teaching styles and methods, and subjective grading. The most common uncivil faculty behaviors reported by participants were general taunts or disrespect to other NF, challenges to other faculty knowledge or credibility, and general taunts or disrespect to NS. Conclusion: The relatively low level of NF academic incivility could still affect the performance of some students, faculty, and program outcomes. Academic institutions need to ensure a policy of zero tolerance to all academic incivility, and regular monitoring and evaluation as part of the prevention strategies.

Original languageEnglish
Article number253
JournalBMC Medical Education
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 13 2017

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nursing
student
incidence
Oman
teaching style
grading
teaching method
Middle East
credibility
tolerance
education
monitoring
university

Keywords

  • Incivility
  • Nursing education
  • Professionalism
  • Safety
  • Undergraduate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Nursing faculty academic incivility : Perceptions of nursing students and faculty. / Muliira, Joshua K.; Natarajan, Jansi; Van Der Colff, Jacoba.

In: BMC Medical Education, Vol. 17, No. 1, 253, 13.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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