Normal faulting in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction margin

Paleoearthquake history and kinematics of the Spili Fault, Crete, Greece

Vasiliki Mouslopoulou, Daniel Moraetis, Lucilla Benedetti, Valery Guillou, Olivier Bellier, Dionisis Hristopulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The late-Cenozoic kinematic and late-Pleistocene paleoearthquake history of the Spili Fault is examined using slip-vector measurements and in situ cosmogenic (36Cl) dating, respectively. The Spili Fault appears to have undergone at least three successive but distinct phases of extension since Messinian (~7Ma), with the most recent faulting resulting in the exhumation of its carbonate plane for a fault-length of ~20km. Earthquake-slip and age data show that the lower 9m of the Spili Fault plane were exhumed during the last ~16,500 years through a minimum of five large-magnitude (Mw>6) earthquakes. The timing between successive paleoearthquakes varied by more than one order of magnitude (from 800 to 9000 years), suggesting a highly variable earthquake recurrence interval during late Pleistocene (CV=1). This variability resulted to significant fluctuations in the displacement rate of the Spili Fault, with the millennium rate (3.5mm/yr) being about six times faster than its late-Pleistocene rate (0.6mm/yr). The observed variability in the slip-size of the paleoearthquakes is, however, significantly smaller (CV=0.3). These data collectively suggest that the Spili Fault is one of the fastest moving faults in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction margin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)298-308
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Structural Geology
Volume66
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

faulting
subduction
kinematics
history
Pleistocene
earthquake recurrence
earthquake
recurrence interval
Messinian
fault plane
exhumation
carbonate
rate

Keywords

  • Cosmogenic dating
  • Crete
  • Limestone scarp
  • Normal fault
  • Paleoearthquakes
  • Spili fault

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology

Cite this

Normal faulting in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction margin : Paleoearthquake history and kinematics of the Spili Fault, Crete, Greece. / Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Moraetis, Daniel; Benedetti, Lucilla; Guillou, Valery; Bellier, Olivier; Hristopulos, Dionisis.

In: Journal of Structural Geology, Vol. 66, 2014, p. 298-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki ; Moraetis, Daniel ; Benedetti, Lucilla ; Guillou, Valery ; Bellier, Olivier ; Hristopulos, Dionisis. / Normal faulting in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction margin : Paleoearthquake history and kinematics of the Spili Fault, Crete, Greece. In: Journal of Structural Geology. 2014 ; Vol. 66. pp. 298-308.
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