Maternal post-natal tobacco use and current parental tobacco use is associated with higher body mass index in children and adolescents

An international crosssectional study

the ISAAC Phase Three Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We investigated whether maternal smoking in the first year of life or any current parental smoking is associated with childhood or adolescent body mass index (BMI). Methods: Secondary analysis of data from a multi-centre, multi-country, cross-sectional study (ISAAC Phase Three). Parents/guardians of children aged 6-7 years completed questionnaires about their children's current height and weight, whether their mother smoked in the first year of the child's life and current smoking habits of both parents. Adolescents aged 13-14 years completed questionnaires about their height, weight and current parental smoking habits. A general linear mixed model was used to determine the association between BMI and parental smoking. Results: 77,192 children (18 countries) and 194 727 adolescents (35 countries) were included. The BMI of children exposed to maternal smoking during their first year of life was 0.11 kg/m2 greater than those who were not (P = 0.0033). The BMI of children of currently smoking parents was greater than those with non-smoking parents (maternal smoking: +0.08 kg/m2 (P = 0.0131), paternal smoking: +0.10 kg/m2 (P < 0.0001)). The BMI of female adolescents exposed to maternal or paternal smoking was 0.23 kg/m2 and 0.09 kg/m2 greater respectively than those who were not exposed (P < 0.0001). The BMI of male adolescents was greater with maternal smoking exposure, but not paternal smoking (0.19 kg/m2, P < 0.0001 and 0.03 kg/m2, P = 0.14 respectively). Conclusion: Parental smoking is associated with higher BMI values in children and adolescents. Whether this is due to a direct effect of parental smoking or to confounding cannot be established from this observational study.

Original languageEnglish
Article number220
JournalBMC Pediatrics
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 24 2015

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Mothers
Parents
Habits
Maternal Exposure
Weights and Measures
Observational Studies
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • BMI
  • Body mass index
  • Child
  • International
  • Obesity
  • Overweight
  • Parental smoking
  • Smoking
  • Tobacco use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Maternal post-natal tobacco use and current parental tobacco use is associated with higher body mass index in children and adolescents : An international crosssectional study. / the ISAAC Phase Three Study Group.

In: BMC Pediatrics, Vol. 15, No. 1, 220, 24.12.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: We investigated whether maternal smoking in the first year of life or any current parental smoking is associated with childhood or adolescent body mass index (BMI). Methods: Secondary analysis of data from a multi-centre, multi-country, cross-sectional study (ISAAC Phase Three). Parents/guardians of children aged 6-7 years completed questionnaires about their children's current height and weight, whether their mother smoked in the first year of the child's life and current smoking habits of both parents. Adolescents aged 13-14 years completed questionnaires about their height, weight and current parental smoking habits. A general linear mixed model was used to determine the association between BMI and parental smoking. Results: 77,192 children (18 countries) and 194 727 adolescents (35 countries) were included. The BMI of children exposed to maternal smoking during their first year of life was 0.11 kg/m2 greater than those who were not (P = 0.0033). The BMI of children of currently smoking parents was greater than those with non-smoking parents (maternal smoking: +0.08 kg/m2 (P = 0.0131), paternal smoking: +0.10 kg/m2 (P < 0.0001)). The BMI of female adolescents exposed to maternal or paternal smoking was 0.23 kg/m2 and 0.09 kg/m2 greater respectively than those who were not exposed (P < 0.0001). The BMI of male adolescents was greater with maternal smoking exposure, but not paternal smoking (0.19 kg/m2, P < 0.0001 and 0.03 kg/m2, P = 0.14 respectively). Conclusion: Parental smoking is associated with higher BMI values in children and adolescents. Whether this is due to a direct effect of parental smoking or to confounding cannot be established from this observational study.",
keywords = "Adolescent, BMI, Body mass index, Child, International, Obesity, Overweight, Parental smoking, Smoking, Tobacco use",
author = "{the ISAAC Phase Three Study Group} and Irene Braithwaite and Stewart, {Alistair W.} and Hancox, {Robert J.} and Richard Beasley and Rinki Murphy and Mitchell, {Edwin A.} and Baena-Cagnani, {C. E.} and M. G{\~A}³mez and J. Weyler and R. Pinto-Vargas and D. Sol{\~A}{\circledC} and Cunha, {A. J L A} and {de Freitas Souza}, L. and M. Sears and A. Ferguson and V. Aguirre and P. Aguilar and Benavides, {L. A V} and A. Contreras and Chen, {Y. Z.} and O. Kunii and {Li Pan}, Q. and Zhong, {N. S.} and G. Wong and Cepeda, {A. M.} and Koffi, {B. N.} and C. Bustos and Riikj{\~A}¤rv, {M. A.} and L. Waqatakirewa and R. Sa'aga-Banuve and J. Pekkanen and E. Vlaski and G. Zsigmond and J. Shah and Mantri, {S. N.} and Sharma, {S. K.} and K. Baratawidjaja and Kartasasmita, {C. B.} and P. Konthen and W. Suprihati and Masjedi, {M. R.} and S. Nishima and H. Odajima and J. Kudzyte and M. Baeza-Bacab and M. Barrag{\~A}¡n-Meijueiro and Del-R{\~A}­o-Navarro, {B. E.} and Linares-Zapi{\~A}{\circledC}n, {F. J.} and N. Ram{\~A}­rez-Chanona and Omar AL-Rawas",
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T1 - Maternal post-natal tobacco use and current parental tobacco use is associated with higher body mass index in children and adolescents

T2 - An international crosssectional study

AU - the ISAAC Phase Three Study Group

AU - Braithwaite, Irene

AU - Stewart, Alistair W.

AU - Hancox, Robert J.

AU - Beasley, Richard

AU - Murphy, Rinki

AU - Mitchell, Edwin A.

AU - Baena-Cagnani, C. E.

AU - Gómez, M.

AU - Weyler, J.

AU - Pinto-Vargas, R.

AU - Solé, D.

AU - Cunha, A. J L A

AU - de Freitas Souza, L.

AU - Sears, M.

AU - Ferguson, A.

AU - Aguirre, V.

AU - Aguilar, P.

AU - Benavides, L. A V

AU - Contreras, A.

AU - Chen, Y. Z.

AU - Kunii, O.

AU - Li Pan, Q.

AU - Zhong, N. S.

AU - Wong, G.

AU - Cepeda, A. M.

AU - Koffi, B. N.

AU - Bustos, C.

AU - Riikjärv, M. A.

AU - Waqatakirewa, L.

AU - Sa'aga-Banuve, R.

AU - Pekkanen, J.

AU - Vlaski, E.

AU - Zsigmond, G.

AU - Shah, J.

AU - Mantri, S. N.

AU - Sharma, S. K.

AU - Baratawidjaja, K.

AU - Kartasasmita, C. B.

AU - Konthen, P.

AU - Suprihati, W.

AU - Masjedi, M. R.

AU - Nishima, S.

AU - Odajima, H.

AU - Kudzyte, J.

AU - Baeza-Bacab, M.

AU - Barragán-Meijueiro, M.

AU - Del-Río-Navarro, B. E.

AU - Linares-Zapién, F. J.

AU - Ramírez-Chanona, N.

AU - AL-Rawas, Omar

PY - 2015/12/24

Y1 - 2015/12/24

N2 - Background: We investigated whether maternal smoking in the first year of life or any current parental smoking is associated with childhood or adolescent body mass index (BMI). Methods: Secondary analysis of data from a multi-centre, multi-country, cross-sectional study (ISAAC Phase Three). Parents/guardians of children aged 6-7 years completed questionnaires about their children's current height and weight, whether their mother smoked in the first year of the child's life and current smoking habits of both parents. Adolescents aged 13-14 years completed questionnaires about their height, weight and current parental smoking habits. A general linear mixed model was used to determine the association between BMI and parental smoking. Results: 77,192 children (18 countries) and 194 727 adolescents (35 countries) were included. The BMI of children exposed to maternal smoking during their first year of life was 0.11 kg/m2 greater than those who were not (P = 0.0033). The BMI of children of currently smoking parents was greater than those with non-smoking parents (maternal smoking: +0.08 kg/m2 (P = 0.0131), paternal smoking: +0.10 kg/m2 (P < 0.0001)). The BMI of female adolescents exposed to maternal or paternal smoking was 0.23 kg/m2 and 0.09 kg/m2 greater respectively than those who were not exposed (P < 0.0001). The BMI of male adolescents was greater with maternal smoking exposure, but not paternal smoking (0.19 kg/m2, P < 0.0001 and 0.03 kg/m2, P = 0.14 respectively). Conclusion: Parental smoking is associated with higher BMI values in children and adolescents. Whether this is due to a direct effect of parental smoking or to confounding cannot be established from this observational study.

AB - Background: We investigated whether maternal smoking in the first year of life or any current parental smoking is associated with childhood or adolescent body mass index (BMI). Methods: Secondary analysis of data from a multi-centre, multi-country, cross-sectional study (ISAAC Phase Three). Parents/guardians of children aged 6-7 years completed questionnaires about their children's current height and weight, whether their mother smoked in the first year of the child's life and current smoking habits of both parents. Adolescents aged 13-14 years completed questionnaires about their height, weight and current parental smoking habits. A general linear mixed model was used to determine the association between BMI and parental smoking. Results: 77,192 children (18 countries) and 194 727 adolescents (35 countries) were included. The BMI of children exposed to maternal smoking during their first year of life was 0.11 kg/m2 greater than those who were not (P = 0.0033). The BMI of children of currently smoking parents was greater than those with non-smoking parents (maternal smoking: +0.08 kg/m2 (P = 0.0131), paternal smoking: +0.10 kg/m2 (P < 0.0001)). The BMI of female adolescents exposed to maternal or paternal smoking was 0.23 kg/m2 and 0.09 kg/m2 greater respectively than those who were not exposed (P < 0.0001). The BMI of male adolescents was greater with maternal smoking exposure, but not paternal smoking (0.19 kg/m2, P < 0.0001 and 0.03 kg/m2, P = 0.14 respectively). Conclusion: Parental smoking is associated with higher BMI values in children and adolescents. Whether this is due to a direct effect of parental smoking or to confounding cannot be established from this observational study.

KW - Adolescent

KW - BMI

KW - Body mass index

KW - Child

KW - International

KW - Obesity

KW - Overweight

KW - Parental smoking

KW - Smoking

KW - Tobacco use

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U2 - 10.1186/s12887-015-0538-x

DO - 10.1186/s12887-015-0538-x

M3 - Article

VL - 15

JO - BMC Pediatrics

JF - BMC Pediatrics

SN - 1471-2431

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