Load modelling for medium voltage SWER distribution networks

Nasser Hosseinzadeh, Sergei Mastakov

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The supply of electricity to customers dispersed across wide geographical areas using the Single Wire Earth Return (SWER) distribution system has been adopted in many rural areas in Australia. This network system is the most economically practical method of supplying continuous power to scattered rural customers. With the increased demand for high power devices such as air conditioners and periodic events such as pumping, as well as the use of long and high impedance feeders, it becomes difficult to maintain good voltage regulation on these networks. Modelling of electrical networks is an important aspect of network analysis. However, current models for SWER networks do not reflect the conditions and voltage drops expected on the actual networks. The use of customer energy data and load diversity rules, in load allocation procedure, provides an opportunity to develop significantly more accurate models. The case studies of the Mistake Creek North and Stanage Bay SWER networks in Central Queensland show a significant improvement in the accuracy of the developed models reflecting the actual network performance.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2008 Australasian Universities Power Engineering Conference, AUPEC 2008
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Event2008 Australasian Universities Power Engineering Conference, AUPEC 2008 - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: Dec 14 2008Dec 17 2008

Other

Other2008 Australasian Universities Power Engineering Conference, AUPEC 2008
CountryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period12/14/0812/17/08

Fingerprint

Electric power distribution
Earth (planet)
Wire
Electric potential
Electric network analysis
Network performance
Voltage control
Electricity
Air

Keywords

  • Load Modelling
  • Power Distribution Systems
  • Rural Electrification
  • Single Wire Earth Return
  • SWER

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Hosseinzadeh, N., & Mastakov, S. (2008). Load modelling for medium voltage SWER distribution networks. In 2008 Australasian Universities Power Engineering Conference, AUPEC 2008 [4813061]

Load modelling for medium voltage SWER distribution networks. / Hosseinzadeh, Nasser; Mastakov, Sergei.

2008 Australasian Universities Power Engineering Conference, AUPEC 2008. 2008. 4813061.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hosseinzadeh, N & Mastakov, S 2008, Load modelling for medium voltage SWER distribution networks. in 2008 Australasian Universities Power Engineering Conference, AUPEC 2008., 4813061, 2008 Australasian Universities Power Engineering Conference, AUPEC 2008, Sydney, NSW, Australia, 12/14/08.
Hosseinzadeh N, Mastakov S. Load modelling for medium voltage SWER distribution networks. In 2008 Australasian Universities Power Engineering Conference, AUPEC 2008. 2008. 4813061
Hosseinzadeh, Nasser ; Mastakov, Sergei. / Load modelling for medium voltage SWER distribution networks. 2008 Australasian Universities Power Engineering Conference, AUPEC 2008. 2008.
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