Landscaping with native plants in Oman

E. Hopkins, R. Al-Yahyai

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Landscapes have traditionally been used to add aesthetic value to our homes and buildings. With the growing concerns of the effects of climate change, deteriorating natural resources, frequent droughts, declining soil fertility, and the threat of pests and diseases, among other issues, particularly in arid regions of the world, actions are needed to ameliorate these effects on residential dwellings and urban landscapes. Ornamentals in the landscape need to evolve and be modified to perform specific functions beyond their aesthetic value, including shading, air filtration, cooling via transpiration, and the abatement of insolation. In many ways traditional landscape designs do address some of these functions. For example, in arid areas, plants can play a crucial role in mediating solar radiation and the heat island effect. In countries like Oman, landscape plants are usually exotic species, which have been selected and cultivated for their performance. In recent years, however, the focus has shifted more to the use and benefits of native species in arid landscapes. Native plants have the potential to tackle many of the aforementioned issues that face landscaping in hot-arid climates, while remaining aesthetically appealing, and also help preserve the natural resources and provide ecological benefits to their surroundings. This paper reviews the criteria used for selecting plants for landscaping in Oman with emphasis on the native species and their aesthetic, ecological and functional values.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVIII International Symposium on New Ornamental Crops and XII International Protea Research Symposium
PublisherInternational Society for Horticultural Science
Pages181-192
Number of pages12
Volume1097
ISBN (Print)9789462610958, 9789462610958
Publication statusPublished - Sep 30 2015

Publication series

NameActa Horticulturae
Volume1097
ISSN (Print)05677572

Fingerprint

landscaping
Oman
aesthetics
ornamental plants
natural resources
arid zones
solar radiation
indigenous species
preserves
soil fertility
transpiration
shade
cooling
drought
climate change
pests
air

Keywords

  • Arid landscapes
  • Heat island
  • Indigenous plants
  • Oasis agriculture
  • Xeriscaping
  • Xerophyte

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Horticulture

Cite this

Hopkins, E., & Al-Yahyai, R. (2015). Landscaping with native plants in Oman. In VIII International Symposium on New Ornamental Crops and XII International Protea Research Symposium (Vol. 1097, pp. 181-192). (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 1097). International Society for Horticultural Science.

Landscaping with native plants in Oman. / Hopkins, E.; Al-Yahyai, R.

VIII International Symposium on New Ornamental Crops and XII International Protea Research Symposium. Vol. 1097 International Society for Horticultural Science, 2015. p. 181-192 (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 1097).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hopkins, E & Al-Yahyai, R 2015, Landscaping with native plants in Oman. in VIII International Symposium on New Ornamental Crops and XII International Protea Research Symposium. vol. 1097, Acta Horticulturae, vol. 1097, International Society for Horticultural Science, pp. 181-192.
Hopkins E, Al-Yahyai R. Landscaping with native plants in Oman. In VIII International Symposium on New Ornamental Crops and XII International Protea Research Symposium. Vol. 1097. International Society for Horticultural Science. 2015. p. 181-192. (Acta Horticulturae).
Hopkins, E. ; Al-Yahyai, R. / Landscaping with native plants in Oman. VIII International Symposium on New Ornamental Crops and XII International Protea Research Symposium. Vol. 1097 International Society for Horticultural Science, 2015. pp. 181-192 (Acta Horticulturae).
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