Land 3D-seismic data: Preprocessing quality control utilizing survey design specifications, noise properties, normal moveout, first breaks, and offset

Abdelmoneam Raef

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recent proliferation of the 3D reflection seismic method into the near-surface area of geophysical applications, especially in response to the emergence of the need to comprehensively characterize and monitor near-surface carbon dioxide sequestration in shallow saline aquifers around the world, justifies the emphasis on cost-effective and robust quality control and assurance (QC/QA) workflow of 3D seismic data preprocessing that is suitable for near-surface applications. The main purpose of our seismic data preprocessing QC is to enable the use of appropriate header information, data that are free of noise-dominated traces, and/or flawed vertical stacking in subsequent processing steps. In this article, I provide an account of utilizing survey design specifications, noise properties, first breaks, and normal moveout for rapid and thorough graphical QC/QA diagnostics, which are easy to apply and efficient in the diagnosis of inconsistencies. A correlated vibroseis time-lapse 3D-seismic data set from a CO2-flood monitoring survey is used for demonstrating QC diagnostics. An important by-product of the QC workflow is establishing the number of layers for a refraction statics model in a data-driven graphical manner that capitalizes on the spatial coverage of the 3D seismic data.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)640-648
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Earth Science
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • 3D seismic
  • 4D seismic
  • Geometry
  • Preprocessing
  • Quality control
  • Trace header
  • Vertical stacking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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