Invasive on invasive-On the feeding ecology of the Ring-necked Parakeet, Psittacula krameri, in Oman (Aves

Psittacidae)

Reginald Victor, Jayanthi R. Victor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Ring-necked Parakeet, Psittacula krameri, an invasive bird species in Oman was found to be feeding on the immature green pods of another invasive tree species, Prosopis juliflora, commonly known as Mesquite. This parakeet strips the pods and consumes the soft seeds within. The green pods collected from the base of trees were a mixture of stripped pods showing various levels of feeding damage and un-stripped pods without any damage. The percentage of stripped pods was significantly higher than that of un-stripped pods. The mean percentage number of pods in the five levels of feeding damage (10, 25, 50, 75 and 100%) significantly differed from each other. The un-stripped and undamaged pods indicate wasteful feeding activity. The comparison of the five levels of feeding damage (10, 25, 50, 75 and 100%) and the undamaged condition (0%) to the mean number of pods as percentages suggests that wasteful feeding is not a random event; the reasons for this relationship are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-206
Number of pages4
JournalZoology in the Middle East
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2013

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Psittacula
Psittacidae
parakeets
Oman
Aves
pods
ecology
feeding level
Prosopis juliflora
Prosopis
immatures

Keywords

  • feeding ecology
  • Mesquite
  • Oman
  • Ring-necked Parakeet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Invasive on invasive-On the feeding ecology of the Ring-necked Parakeet, Psittacula krameri, in Oman (Aves : Psittacidae). / Victor, Reginald; Victor, Jayanthi R.

In: Zoology in the Middle East, Vol. 59, No. 3, 01.09.2013, p. 203-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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