Interactions between B lymphocytes and NK cells

Dorothy Yuan, Crystal Y. Koh, Julie A. Wilder

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of natural killer (NK) cells to secrete lymphokines confers upon them the potential to regulate cell types via mechanisms other than direct cytotoxicity. During the past few years increasing evidence has been accumulating to show that NK and B cells can interact productively. First, NK cells cocultured with B cells can induce them to initiate polyclonal Ig secretion. This help is mediated by a soluble factor (or factors) that appears to be different from any known cytokine. Second, preactivated B lymphocytes can induce NK cells to produce greater amounts of IFN-γ via an interaction that requires direct cell contact. Third, in contrast to previous suggestions, NK cells do not have the ability to kill primary B lymphocytes regardless of their stage of differentiation. Evaluation of the in vivo relevance of these interactions revealed that activated NK cells can increase the IgG2a response to a specific protein antigen. Without activation, NK cells neither enhance nor inhibit B cell responses to antigens. The deviation of the isotype distribution may allow increased NK cell specificity for certain pathogens by enhancing antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1012-1018
Number of pages7
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume8
Issue number13
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Lymphocytes
natural killer cells
Natural Killer Cells
B-lymphocytes
B-Lymphocytes
Cells
Cytotoxicity
Antigens
Blocking Antibodies
Lymphokines
Pathogens
Chemical activation
Cytokines
cytotoxicity
lymphokines
antigens
Proteins
cytokines
secretion
cells

Keywords

  • cytotoxicity
  • IFN-γ
  • immunoglobulin
  • isotypes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Yuan, D., Koh, C. Y., & Wilder, J. A. (1994). Interactions between B lymphocytes and NK cells. FASEB Journal, 8(13), 1012-1018.

Interactions between B lymphocytes and NK cells. / Yuan, Dorothy; Koh, Crystal Y.; Wilder, Julie A.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 8, No. 13, 1994, p. 1012-1018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Yuan, D, Koh, CY & Wilder, JA 1994, 'Interactions between B lymphocytes and NK cells', FASEB Journal, vol. 8, no. 13, pp. 1012-1018.
Yuan, Dorothy ; Koh, Crystal Y. ; Wilder, Julie A. / Interactions between B lymphocytes and NK cells. In: FASEB Journal. 1994 ; Vol. 8, No. 13. pp. 1012-1018.
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