Integrated, geothermal-CO2 storage reservoirs: Adaptable, multi-stage, sustainable, energy-recovery strategies that reduce carbon intensity and environmental risk

Thomas A. Buscheck, Thomas R. Elliot, Michael A. Celia, Mingjie Chen, Yue Hao, Chuanhe Lu, Yunwei Sun

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We analyze an adaptable, multi-stage, energy-recovery approach to reduce carbon intensity through sustainable geothermal energy production and secure geologic CO2 storage (GCS) with low environmental risk in saline, sedimentary formations. We combine the benefits of the approach proposed by Buscheck (2010), which uses brine as the heat-transfer working fluid, with those of the approach first suggested by Brown (2000) and analyzed by Pruess (2006), using CO2 as the working fluid, and then extended to saline-formation GCS by Saar et al. (2010) and Randolph and Saar (2011a). We also use pressure management to reduce the risks of induced seismicity and CO2 and brine leakage (Buscheck et al., 2012a; Court et al., 2012, 2011a, 2011b). Our approach can involve up to three stages, with stage one of the three-stage version involving recirculation of formation brine as the working fluid. In this paper we analyze a two-stage version, with stage one involving production (and net removal) of formation brine for heat recovery and to provide pressure management/relief for CO2 injection. Net removal of produced brine is achieved by applying it to a beneficial consumptive use: feedstock for fresh water production through desalination, saline cooling water, or make-up water injected into a nearby reservoir operation, such as in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), where there can be a shortage of working fluid. For stage one, it is important to find feasible utilization/disposition options to reduce the volume of blowdown, which is the residual brine requiring injection into the geothermal-GCS reservoir (Buscheck et al. 2012a, 2012b). During stage two, which begins as CO2 reaches the producers; co-produced brine and CO 2 are the working fluids. We present reservoir analyses of two-stage, integrated geothermal-GCS, using a simple conceptual model of a homogeneous, permeable reservoir, bounded by relatively impermeable sealing units. We assess CO2 storage capacity and geothermal energy production as a function of well spacing between CO2 injectors and brine/CO2 producers for various well patterns.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTransactions - Geothermal Resources Council
Pages373-382
Number of pages10
Volume36 1
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventGeothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting 2012 - Geothermal: Reliable, Renewable, Global, GRC 2012 - Reno, NV, United States
Duration: Sep 30 2012Oct 3 2012

Other

OtherGeothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting 2012 - Geothermal: Reliable, Renewable, Global, GRC 2012
CountryUnited States
CityReno, NV
Period9/30/1210/3/12

Keywords

  • Co-production
  • Geologic CO storage
  • Geothermal
  • Heat extraction
  • Reservoir simulation
  • Sedimentary formation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment

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  • Cite this

    Buscheck, T. A., Elliot, T. R., Celia, M. A., Chen, M., Hao, Y., Lu, C., & Sun, Y. (2012). Integrated, geothermal-CO2 storage reservoirs: Adaptable, multi-stage, sustainable, energy-recovery strategies that reduce carbon intensity and environmental risk. In Transactions - Geothermal Resources Council (Vol. 36 1, pp. 373-382)