Influence of EEG artifacts on detecting neonatal seizure

M. S. Khlif, M. Mesbah, B. Boashash, P. Colditz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although EEG is intended to record cerebral activity, extra-cerebral activities from sites other than the brain are also recorded. Extraneous activities, known as artifacts, are generated by biological and non-biological sources. Knowing the difference between true cerebral activity and extraneous artifacts is critical in the interpretation of neonatal EEG. And, because artifacts can mimic true brain activity, responsibility lies on neurologists and anyone designing EEG-based systems to sift the "wheat from the chaff'. It is their duty to be able to recognize artifacts and to remove or reduce their influence so that effective detection of seizures can be achieved. We propose few artifact removal techniques and we evaluate their efficiency in enhancing the detection of neonatal seizures. Our detection method is based on the matching pursuit (MP) using a coherent time-frequency (TF) dictionary. Evaluation of 35 neonatal EEG records indicated an 18.3% increase in detection accuracy when artifact removal techniques were implemented.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication10th International Conference on Information Sciences, Signal Processing and their Applications, ISSPA 2010
Pages500-503
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event10th International Conference on Information Sciences, Signal Processing and their Applications, ISSPA 2010 - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Duration: May 10 2010May 13 2010

Other

Other10th International Conference on Information Sciences, Signal Processing and their Applications, ISSPA 2010
CountryMalaysia
CityKuala Lumpur
Period5/10/105/13/10

Fingerprint

Electroencephalography
Brain
Glossaries

Keywords

  • Artifacts
  • EEG
  • Matching pursuit
  • Seizure
  • Time-frequency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Information Systems
  • Signal Processing

Cite this

Khlif, M. S., Mesbah, M., Boashash, B., & Colditz, P. (2010). Influence of EEG artifacts on detecting neonatal seizure. In 10th International Conference on Information Sciences, Signal Processing and their Applications, ISSPA 2010 (pp. 500-503). [5605604] https://doi.org/10.1109/ISSPA.2010.5605604

Influence of EEG artifacts on detecting neonatal seizure. / Khlif, M. S.; Mesbah, M.; Boashash, B.; Colditz, P.

10th International Conference on Information Sciences, Signal Processing and their Applications, ISSPA 2010. 2010. p. 500-503 5605604.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Khlif, MS, Mesbah, M, Boashash, B & Colditz, P 2010, Influence of EEG artifacts on detecting neonatal seizure. in 10th International Conference on Information Sciences, Signal Processing and their Applications, ISSPA 2010., 5605604, pp. 500-503, 10th International Conference on Information Sciences, Signal Processing and their Applications, ISSPA 2010, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 5/10/10. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISSPA.2010.5605604
Khlif MS, Mesbah M, Boashash B, Colditz P. Influence of EEG artifacts on detecting neonatal seizure. In 10th International Conference on Information Sciences, Signal Processing and their Applications, ISSPA 2010. 2010. p. 500-503. 5605604 https://doi.org/10.1109/ISSPA.2010.5605604
Khlif, M. S. ; Mesbah, M. ; Boashash, B. ; Colditz, P. / Influence of EEG artifacts on detecting neonatal seizure. 10th International Conference on Information Sciences, Signal Processing and their Applications, ISSPA 2010. 2010. pp. 500-503
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