Individual and culture-level components of survey response styles

A multi-level analysis using cultural models of selfhood

Peter B. Smith, Vivian L. Vignoles, Maja Becker, Ellinor Owe, Matthew J. Easterbrook, Rupert Brown, David Bourguignon, Ragna B. Garðarsdóttir, Robert Kreuzbauer, Boris Cendales Ayala, Masaki Yuki, Jianxin Zhang, Shaobo Lv, Phatthanakit Chobthamkit, Jas Laile Jaafar, Ronald Fischer, Taciano L. Milfont, Alin Gavreliuc, Peter Baguma, Michael Harris Bond & 40 others Mariana Martin, Nicolay Gausel, Seth J. Schwartz, Sabrina E. Des Rosiers, Alexander Tatarko, Roberto González, Nicolas Didier, Diego Carrasco, Siugmin Lay, George Nizharadze, Ana Torres, Leoncio Camino, Sami Abuhamdeh, Ma Elizabeth J. Macapagal, Silvia H. Koller, Ginette Herman, Marie Courtois, Immo Fritsche, Agustín Espinosa, Juan A. Villamar, Camillo Regalia, Claudia Manzi, Maria Brambilla, Martina Zinkeng, Baland Jalal, Ersin Kusdil, Benjamin Amponsah, Selinay Çağlar, Kassahun Habtamu Mekonnen, Bettina Möller, Xiao Zhang, Inge Schweiger Gallo, Paula Prieto Gil, Raquel Lorente Clemares, Gabriella Campara, Said Aldhafri, Márta Fülöp, Tom Pyszczynski, Pelin Kesebir, Charles Harb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Variations in acquiescence and extremity pose substantial threats to the validity of cross-cultural research that relies on survey methods. Individual and cultural correlates of response styles when using 2 contrasting types of response mode were investigated, drawing on data from 55 cultural groups across 33 nations. Using 7 dimensions of self-other relatedness that have often been confounded within the broader distinction between independence and interdependence, our analysis yields more specific understandings of both individual- and culture-level variations in response style. When using a Likert-scale response format, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as similar to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour harmony, similarity with others and receptiveness to influence. However, when using Schwartz's (2007) portrait-comparison response procedure, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant but also connected to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour self-reliance and self-consistency. Extreme responding varies less between the two types of response modes, and is most prevalent among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant, and in cultures favouring self-reliance. As both types of response mode elicit distinctive styles of response, it remains important to estimate and control for style effects to ensure valid comparisons.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-463
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Psychology
Volume51
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2016

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Extremities
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Cultural Models
Selfhood
Multilevel Analysis

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Response style
  • Self-construal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Individual and culture-level components of survey response styles : A multi-level analysis using cultural models of selfhood. / Smith, Peter B.; Vignoles, Vivian L.; Becker, Maja; Owe, Ellinor; Easterbrook, Matthew J.; Brown, Rupert; Bourguignon, David; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B.; Kreuzbauer, Robert; Cendales Ayala, Boris; Yuki, Masaki; Zhang, Jianxin; Lv, Shaobo; Chobthamkit, Phatthanakit; Jaafar, Jas Laile; Fischer, Ronald; Milfont, Taciano L.; Gavreliuc, Alin; Baguma, Peter; Bond, Michael Harris; Martin, Mariana; Gausel, Nicolay; Schwartz, Seth J.; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E.; Tatarko, Alexander; González, Roberto; Didier, Nicolas; Carrasco, Diego; Lay, Siugmin; Nizharadze, George; Torres, Ana; Camino, Leoncio; Abuhamdeh, Sami; Macapagal, Ma Elizabeth J.; Koller, Silvia H.; Herman, Ginette; Courtois, Marie; Fritsche, Immo; Espinosa, Agustín; Villamar, Juan A.; Regalia, Camillo; Manzi, Claudia; Brambilla, Maria; Zinkeng, Martina; Jalal, Baland; Kusdil, Ersin; Amponsah, Benjamin; Çağlar, Selinay; Mekonnen, Kassahun Habtamu; Möller, Bettina; Zhang, Xiao; Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Prieto Gil, Paula; Lorente Clemares, Raquel; Campara, Gabriella; Aldhafri, Said; Fülöp, Márta; Pyszczynski, Tom; Kesebir, Pelin; Harb, Charles.

In: International Journal of Psychology, Vol. 51, No. 6, 01.12.2016, p. 453-463.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, PB, Vignoles, VL, Becker, M, Owe, E, Easterbrook, MJ, Brown, R, Bourguignon, D, Garðarsdóttir, RB, Kreuzbauer, R, Cendales Ayala, B, Yuki, M, Zhang, J, Lv, S, Chobthamkit, P, Jaafar, JL, Fischer, R, Milfont, TL, Gavreliuc, A, Baguma, P, Bond, MH, Martin, M, Gausel, N, Schwartz, SJ, Des Rosiers, SE, Tatarko, A, González, R, Didier, N, Carrasco, D, Lay, S, Nizharadze, G, Torres, A, Camino, L, Abuhamdeh, S, Macapagal, MEJ, Koller, SH, Herman, G, Courtois, M, Fritsche, I, Espinosa, A, Villamar, JA, Regalia, C, Manzi, C, Brambilla, M, Zinkeng, M, Jalal, B, Kusdil, E, Amponsah, B, Çağlar, S, Mekonnen, KH, Möller, B, Zhang, X, Schweiger Gallo, I, Prieto Gil, P, Lorente Clemares, R, Campara, G, Aldhafri, S, Fülöp, M, Pyszczynski, T, Kesebir, P & Harb, C 2016, 'Individual and culture-level components of survey response styles: A multi-level analysis using cultural models of selfhood', International Journal of Psychology, vol. 51, no. 6, pp. 453-463. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijop.12293
Smith, Peter B. ; Vignoles, Vivian L. ; Becker, Maja ; Owe, Ellinor ; Easterbrook, Matthew J. ; Brown, Rupert ; Bourguignon, David ; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B. ; Kreuzbauer, Robert ; Cendales Ayala, Boris ; Yuki, Masaki ; Zhang, Jianxin ; Lv, Shaobo ; Chobthamkit, Phatthanakit ; Jaafar, Jas Laile ; Fischer, Ronald ; Milfont, Taciano L. ; Gavreliuc, Alin ; Baguma, Peter ; Bond, Michael Harris ; Martin, Mariana ; Gausel, Nicolay ; Schwartz, Seth J. ; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E. ; Tatarko, Alexander ; González, Roberto ; Didier, Nicolas ; Carrasco, Diego ; Lay, Siugmin ; Nizharadze, George ; Torres, Ana ; Camino, Leoncio ; Abuhamdeh, Sami ; Macapagal, Ma Elizabeth J. ; Koller, Silvia H. ; Herman, Ginette ; Courtois, Marie ; Fritsche, Immo ; Espinosa, Agustín ; Villamar, Juan A. ; Regalia, Camillo ; Manzi, Claudia ; Brambilla, Maria ; Zinkeng, Martina ; Jalal, Baland ; Kusdil, Ersin ; Amponsah, Benjamin ; Çağlar, Selinay ; Mekonnen, Kassahun Habtamu ; Möller, Bettina ; Zhang, Xiao ; Schweiger Gallo, Inge ; Prieto Gil, Paula ; Lorente Clemares, Raquel ; Campara, Gabriella ; Aldhafri, Said ; Fülöp, Márta ; Pyszczynski, Tom ; Kesebir, Pelin ; Harb, Charles. / Individual and culture-level components of survey response styles : A multi-level analysis using cultural models of selfhood. In: International Journal of Psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 51, No. 6. pp. 453-463.
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AU - Smith, Peter B.

AU - Vignoles, Vivian L.

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AU - Owe, Ellinor

AU - Easterbrook, Matthew J.

AU - Brown, Rupert

AU - Bourguignon, David

AU - Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B.

AU - Kreuzbauer, Robert

AU - Cendales Ayala, Boris

AU - Yuki, Masaki

AU - Zhang, Jianxin

AU - Lv, Shaobo

AU - Chobthamkit, Phatthanakit

AU - Jaafar, Jas Laile

AU - Fischer, Ronald

AU - Milfont, Taciano L.

AU - Gavreliuc, Alin

AU - Baguma, Peter

AU - Bond, Michael Harris

AU - Martin, Mariana

AU - Gausel, Nicolay

AU - Schwartz, Seth J.

AU - Des Rosiers, Sabrina E.

AU - Tatarko, Alexander

AU - González, Roberto

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AU - Lay, Siugmin

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AU - Camino, Leoncio

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AU - Courtois, Marie

AU - Fritsche, Immo

AU - Espinosa, Agustín

AU - Villamar, Juan A.

AU - Regalia, Camillo

AU - Manzi, Claudia

AU - Brambilla, Maria

AU - Zinkeng, Martina

AU - Jalal, Baland

AU - Kusdil, Ersin

AU - Amponsah, Benjamin

AU - Çağlar, Selinay

AU - Mekonnen, Kassahun Habtamu

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AU - Schweiger Gallo, Inge

AU - Prieto Gil, Paula

AU - Lorente Clemares, Raquel

AU - Campara, Gabriella

AU - Aldhafri, Said

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AU - Harb, Charles

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