Impact of organizational silence and favoritism on nurse's work outcomes and psychological well-being

Janet Alexis A. De los Santos*, Rheajane A. Rosales, Charlie C. Falguera, Carmen N. Firmo, Konstantinos Tsaras, Leodoro J. Labrague

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The study aimed to assess the impacts of organizational silence and favoritism on work outcomes and psychological wellbeing among nurses working in hospitals. Background: Literature on the organizational climate among nurses in hospital settings is limited, particularly on favoritism and organizational silence and their effect on nurses. Methods: Purposive sampling was used to gather 549 registered nurses who participated in this cross-sectional study. Standardized self-report questionnaires were used to gather the necessary data. Results: Years in the nursing profession (β =.028, P <.001), location of work (β = 0.481, P <.001), and facility size (β = 0.451, P <.001) strongly predicted organizational silence, while years in the present unit (β = 0.020, P =.022) and last shift length (β = 0.200, P =.012) predicted favoritism. Favoritism (β = 0.226, P =.028) significantly influenced turnover intention in nurses. Conclusion: Higher levels of favoritism within the organization are strongly linked with nurses' turnover intention. Few individual and organizational variables predicted organizational silence and favoritism. Implications to Nursing Management: The results of this study provide an insight to the effects of organizational silence and favoritism towards nurses' work outcomes and psychological wellbeing. Improving the channels of communication among the healthcare team is vital to promote inclusivity among healthcare workers and enhance organizational viability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)782-792
Number of pages11
JournalNursing Forum
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2020

Keywords

  • favoritism
  • nursing
  • organizational silence
  • turnover intention
  • work outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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