Gum arabic reduces inflammation, oxidative, and nitrosative stress in the gastrointestinal tract of mice with chronic kidney disease

Badreldin H. Ali, Mohammed Al Za’abi, Yousuf Al Suleimani, Priyadarsini Manoj, Haytham Ali, Daniel A. Ribeiro*, Abderrahim Nemmar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate some biochemical indices of inflammation and oxidative and nitrosative stresses in the gastrointestinal tract of mice with experimental chronic kidney disease (CKD) and treated with gum arabic (GA). Male CD1 mice (n = 28) were randomly distributed into four groups and treated for four consecutive weeks: group 1: Control: received the same diet without treatment until the end of the study; group 2: Adenine: switched to a powder diet containing adenine (0.2% w/w in feed); group 3: Gum acacia (GA): given normal feed and GA in drinking water at a concentration of 15% w/v; and group 4: Adenine + GA: given adenine in the feed as in the second group plus GA in the drinking water at concentration of 15% w/v. CKD was induced to mice by adenine feeding and concomitantly treated with the prebiotic dietary fiber gum acacia, GA (15% in drinking water). Duodenal mucosa from CKD mice had significantly higher concentrations of TNF-alfa, IL- 6, and TGF-beta-1 and lipid peroxidation. Moreover, low concentrations of IL-10, some antioxidants (catalase, glutathione reductase, total antioxidant capacity, and superoxide dismutase), and nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 were found in the duodenum. The levels of nitrosative stress (nitrite, nitrate, and total nitrate) were significantly increased by CKD, as well as the concentrations of ammonia and urea creatinine in the cecal content. Concomitant GA treatment significantly mitigated these harmful effects. Taken together, GA reduces inflammation and duodenal oxidative and nitrosative stress in the gastrointestinal tract of mice with CKD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1427-1436
Number of pages10
JournalNaunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology
Volume393
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2020

Keywords

  • Adenine
  • Cecum
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Duodenum
  • Gum acacia
  • Mice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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