Flotation, filtration, and adsorption pilot trials for oilfield produced water treatment

Rashid S. Al-Maamari, Mark Sueyoshi, Masaharu Tasaki, Kazuo Okamura, Yasmeen Al-Lawati, Randa Nabulsi, Mundhir Al-Battashi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As an oil field matures, it produces larger quantities of produced water. Appropriate treatment levels and technologies depend on a number of factors such as disposal methods or reutilization aims, environmental impacts, and economics. In this study, a pilot plant of capacity 50 m3· day-1 was utilized to conduct flotation, filtration, and adsorption trials for produced water treatment at a crude oil gathering facility. The plant's flexible design allows for the testing of different combinations of these processes based on the requirements of the water to be treated. The subject water during this study was a complex and changing mixture of brine and oil from different oilfields. Induced gas flotation trials were conducted, with different coagulant (poly-aluminum chloride or PAC) addition rates from 0-820 mg·L-1. Inlet oil-in-water (OIW) concentrations were quite varied during the trials, ranging from 39-279 mg·L-1 (fluorescence analysis method) and 12-340 mg·L-1 (infrared analysis method). Turbidity also varied, ranging from 85-279 FTU. Through flocculation/coagulation and flotation, dispersed oils were removed from the water. PAC addition ranging from 60-185 mg·L-1 resulted in reduction of dispersed oil concentration to below 50 mg·L-1 in treated water. PAC addition ranging from 101-200 mg·L-1 resulted in reduction of dispersed oil concentration below 15 mg·L -1 in treated water. Turbidity was also reduced through flotation, trial average reductions ranging from 57-78%. Filtration further reduced turbidity at rates above 80% through the removal of any suspended solids remaining from flotation. Activated carbon adsorption reduced OIW concentrations of flotation/filtration treated water to 5 mg·L-1 through the removal of dissolved oil remaining in the water. Results confirmed that such adsorption treatment would be more practical for water with lower COD concentration, due to high COD concentrations in water drastically reducing the lifetime of activated carbon.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSociety of Petroleum Engineers - Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference 2012, ADIPEC 2012 - Sustainable Energy Growth: People, Responsibility, and Innovation
Pages1206-1222
Number of pages17
Volume2
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventAbu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference 2012 - Sustainable Energy Growth: People, Responsibility, and Innovation, ADIPEC 2012 - Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Duration: Nov 11 2012Nov 14 2012

Other

OtherAbu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference 2012 - Sustainable Energy Growth: People, Responsibility, and Innovation, ADIPEC 2012
CountryUnited Arab Emirates
CityAbu Dhabi
Period11/11/1211/14/12

Fingerprint

Flotation
Water treatment
water treatment
adsorption
Adsorption
Water
Oils
oil
Turbidity
water
turbidity
Activated carbon
activated carbon
Water filtration
Produced Water
trial
flotation
Coagulants
Petroleum
Flocculation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

Al-Maamari, R. S., Sueyoshi, M., Tasaki, M., Okamura, K., Al-Lawati, Y., Nabulsi, R., & Al-Battashi, M. (2012). Flotation, filtration, and adsorption pilot trials for oilfield produced water treatment. In Society of Petroleum Engineers - Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference 2012, ADIPEC 2012 - Sustainable Energy Growth: People, Responsibility, and Innovation (Vol. 2, pp. 1206-1222)

Flotation, filtration, and adsorption pilot trials for oilfield produced water treatment. / Al-Maamari, Rashid S.; Sueyoshi, Mark; Tasaki, Masaharu; Okamura, Kazuo; Al-Lawati, Yasmeen; Nabulsi, Randa; Al-Battashi, Mundhir.

Society of Petroleum Engineers - Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference 2012, ADIPEC 2012 - Sustainable Energy Growth: People, Responsibility, and Innovation. Vol. 2 2012. p. 1206-1222.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Al-Maamari, RS, Sueyoshi, M, Tasaki, M, Okamura, K, Al-Lawati, Y, Nabulsi, R & Al-Battashi, M 2012, Flotation, filtration, and adsorption pilot trials for oilfield produced water treatment. in Society of Petroleum Engineers - Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference 2012, ADIPEC 2012 - Sustainable Energy Growth: People, Responsibility, and Innovation. vol. 2, pp. 1206-1222, Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference 2012 - Sustainable Energy Growth: People, Responsibility, and Innovation, ADIPEC 2012, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, 11/11/12.
Al-Maamari RS, Sueyoshi M, Tasaki M, Okamura K, Al-Lawati Y, Nabulsi R et al. Flotation, filtration, and adsorption pilot trials for oilfield produced water treatment. In Society of Petroleum Engineers - Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference 2012, ADIPEC 2012 - Sustainable Energy Growth: People, Responsibility, and Innovation. Vol. 2. 2012. p. 1206-1222
Al-Maamari, Rashid S. ; Sueyoshi, Mark ; Tasaki, Masaharu ; Okamura, Kazuo ; Al-Lawati, Yasmeen ; Nabulsi, Randa ; Al-Battashi, Mundhir. / Flotation, filtration, and adsorption pilot trials for oilfield produced water treatment. Society of Petroleum Engineers - Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference 2012, ADIPEC 2012 - Sustainable Energy Growth: People, Responsibility, and Innovation. Vol. 2 2012. pp. 1206-1222
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