Familial clustering of type 2 diabetes among Omanis

Sawsan Al-Sinani, Mohammed Al-Shafaee, Ali Al-Mamari, Nicholas Woodhouse, Omaima Al-Shafie, Mohammed Hassan, Said Al-Yahyaee, Sulayma Albarwani, Deepali Jaju, Khamis Al-Hashmi, Mohammed Al-Abri, Syed Rizvi, Riad Bayoumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to screen Omani individuals for the familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A random cohort of 1182 Omani individuals visiting the Family Medicine Clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, for regular medical checkup, aged ≥40 years, were sampled. Patients were categorized into three groups: (1) individuals who claim not to have diabetes and had no family history of diabetes; (2) individuals who claim not to have diabetes but had family history of diabetes; (3) individuals with diabetes. Only 16% of these Omani individuals had no diabetes and no family history of diabetes. Another separate random cohort of 234 Omani type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, from the Diabetes Clinic at SQUH, were interviewed and questioned about their family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results: Ninety five percent of the patients had a family history of diabetes. Eighty percent had first degree relatives with diabetes and 46% had second degree relatives with diabetes. At least one parent with diabetes was reported among 55% of these diabetics, while maternal diabetes (55%) was found to be higher than paternal diabetes (47%). However, only 15% had both parents with diabetes. Furthermore, almost half of the 234 diabetics were having at least one of the following relatives with diabetes: brother, sister, aunt or an uncle. Conclusion: The findings of this study confirm familial aggregation of diabetes among the Omani population. Compared to other populations, familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Omanis is relatively very high, and is perhaps due to the very high degree of consanguinity among Omanis. Since almost everyone seems to have a genetic predisposition to diabetes, the dramatic lifestyle changes over the past 25 years, could tip the population into an epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-54
Number of pages4
JournalOman Medical Journal
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Cluster Analysis
Siblings
Oman
Population
Consanguinity
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Life Style
Parents
Mothers
Medicine

Keywords

  • Family clustering
  • Oman
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Al-Sinani, S., Al-Shafaee, M., Al-Mamari, A., Woodhouse, N., Al-Shafie, O., Hassan, M., ... Bayoumi, R. (2014). Familial clustering of type 2 diabetes among Omanis. Oman Medical Journal, 29(1), 51-54. https://doi.org/10.5001/omj.2014.11

Familial clustering of type 2 diabetes among Omanis. / Al-Sinani, Sawsan; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed; Al-Mamari, Ali; Woodhouse, Nicholas; Al-Shafie, Omaima; Hassan, Mohammed; Al-Yahyaee, Said; Albarwani, Sulayma; Jaju, Deepali; Al-Hashmi, Khamis; Al-Abri, Mohammed; Rizvi, Syed; Bayoumi, Riad.

In: Oman Medical Journal, Vol. 29, No. 1, 2014, p. 51-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Al-Sinani, S, Al-Shafaee, M, Al-Mamari, A, Woodhouse, N, Al-Shafie, O, Hassan, M, Al-Yahyaee, S, Albarwani, S, Jaju, D, Al-Hashmi, K, Al-Abri, M, Rizvi, S & Bayoumi, R 2014, 'Familial clustering of type 2 diabetes among Omanis', Oman Medical Journal, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 51-54. https://doi.org/10.5001/omj.2014.11
Al-Sinani S, Al-Shafaee M, Al-Mamari A, Woodhouse N, Al-Shafie O, Hassan M et al. Familial clustering of type 2 diabetes among Omanis. Oman Medical Journal. 2014;29(1):51-54. https://doi.org/10.5001/omj.2014.11
Al-Sinani, Sawsan ; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed ; Al-Mamari, Ali ; Woodhouse, Nicholas ; Al-Shafie, Omaima ; Hassan, Mohammed ; Al-Yahyaee, Said ; Albarwani, Sulayma ; Jaju, Deepali ; Al-Hashmi, Khamis ; Al-Abri, Mohammed ; Rizvi, Syed ; Bayoumi, Riad. / Familial clustering of type 2 diabetes among Omanis. In: Oman Medical Journal. 2014 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 51-54.
@article{dbc2b90749024148b83b2545b4cb3c52,
title = "Familial clustering of type 2 diabetes among Omanis",
abstract = "Objective: The aim of this study was to screen Omani individuals for the familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A random cohort of 1182 Omani individuals visiting the Family Medicine Clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, for regular medical checkup, aged ≥40 years, were sampled. Patients were categorized into three groups: (1) individuals who claim not to have diabetes and had no family history of diabetes; (2) individuals who claim not to have diabetes but had family history of diabetes; (3) individuals with diabetes. Only 16{\%} of these Omani individuals had no diabetes and no family history of diabetes. Another separate random cohort of 234 Omani type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, from the Diabetes Clinic at SQUH, were interviewed and questioned about their family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results: Ninety five percent of the patients had a family history of diabetes. Eighty percent had first degree relatives with diabetes and 46{\%} had second degree relatives with diabetes. At least one parent with diabetes was reported among 55{\%} of these diabetics, while maternal diabetes (55{\%}) was found to be higher than paternal diabetes (47{\%}). However, only 15{\%} had both parents with diabetes. Furthermore, almost half of the 234 diabetics were having at least one of the following relatives with diabetes: brother, sister, aunt or an uncle. Conclusion: The findings of this study confirm familial aggregation of diabetes among the Omani population. Compared to other populations, familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Omanis is relatively very high, and is perhaps due to the very high degree of consanguinity among Omanis. Since almost everyone seems to have a genetic predisposition to diabetes, the dramatic lifestyle changes over the past 25 years, could tip the population into an epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus.",
keywords = "Family clustering, Oman, Type 2 diabetes mellitus",
author = "Sawsan Al-Sinani and Mohammed Al-Shafaee and Ali Al-Mamari and Nicholas Woodhouse and Omaima Al-Shafie and Mohammed Hassan and Said Al-Yahyaee and Sulayma Albarwani and Deepali Jaju and Khamis Al-Hashmi and Mohammed Al-Abri and Syed Rizvi and Riad Bayoumi",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.5001/omj.2014.11",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "51--54",
journal = "Oman Medical Journal",
issn = "1999-768X",
publisher = "Oman Medical Specialty Board",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Familial clustering of type 2 diabetes among Omanis

AU - Al-Sinani, Sawsan

AU - Al-Shafaee, Mohammed

AU - Al-Mamari, Ali

AU - Woodhouse, Nicholas

AU - Al-Shafie, Omaima

AU - Hassan, Mohammed

AU - Al-Yahyaee, Said

AU - Albarwani, Sulayma

AU - Jaju, Deepali

AU - Al-Hashmi, Khamis

AU - Al-Abri, Mohammed

AU - Rizvi, Syed

AU - Bayoumi, Riad

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objective: The aim of this study was to screen Omani individuals for the familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A random cohort of 1182 Omani individuals visiting the Family Medicine Clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, for regular medical checkup, aged ≥40 years, were sampled. Patients were categorized into three groups: (1) individuals who claim not to have diabetes and had no family history of diabetes; (2) individuals who claim not to have diabetes but had family history of diabetes; (3) individuals with diabetes. Only 16% of these Omani individuals had no diabetes and no family history of diabetes. Another separate random cohort of 234 Omani type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, from the Diabetes Clinic at SQUH, were interviewed and questioned about their family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results: Ninety five percent of the patients had a family history of diabetes. Eighty percent had first degree relatives with diabetes and 46% had second degree relatives with diabetes. At least one parent with diabetes was reported among 55% of these diabetics, while maternal diabetes (55%) was found to be higher than paternal diabetes (47%). However, only 15% had both parents with diabetes. Furthermore, almost half of the 234 diabetics were having at least one of the following relatives with diabetes: brother, sister, aunt or an uncle. Conclusion: The findings of this study confirm familial aggregation of diabetes among the Omani population. Compared to other populations, familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Omanis is relatively very high, and is perhaps due to the very high degree of consanguinity among Omanis. Since almost everyone seems to have a genetic predisposition to diabetes, the dramatic lifestyle changes over the past 25 years, could tip the population into an epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

AB - Objective: The aim of this study was to screen Omani individuals for the familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: A random cohort of 1182 Omani individuals visiting the Family Medicine Clinic at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, for regular medical checkup, aged ≥40 years, were sampled. Patients were categorized into three groups: (1) individuals who claim not to have diabetes and had no family history of diabetes; (2) individuals who claim not to have diabetes but had family history of diabetes; (3) individuals with diabetes. Only 16% of these Omani individuals had no diabetes and no family history of diabetes. Another separate random cohort of 234 Omani type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, from the Diabetes Clinic at SQUH, were interviewed and questioned about their family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results: Ninety five percent of the patients had a family history of diabetes. Eighty percent had first degree relatives with diabetes and 46% had second degree relatives with diabetes. At least one parent with diabetes was reported among 55% of these diabetics, while maternal diabetes (55%) was found to be higher than paternal diabetes (47%). However, only 15% had both parents with diabetes. Furthermore, almost half of the 234 diabetics were having at least one of the following relatives with diabetes: brother, sister, aunt or an uncle. Conclusion: The findings of this study confirm familial aggregation of diabetes among the Omani population. Compared to other populations, familial aggregation of type 2 diabetes mellitus among Omanis is relatively very high, and is perhaps due to the very high degree of consanguinity among Omanis. Since almost everyone seems to have a genetic predisposition to diabetes, the dramatic lifestyle changes over the past 25 years, could tip the population into an epidemic of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

KW - Family clustering

KW - Oman

KW - Type 2 diabetes mellitus

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84892983542&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84892983542&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5001/omj.2014.11

DO - 10.5001/omj.2014.11

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84892983542

VL - 29

SP - 51

EP - 54

JO - Oman Medical Journal

JF - Oman Medical Journal

SN - 1999-768X

IS - 1

ER -