Environmental impact of the Gulf War

An integrated preliminary assessment

Hosny Khordagui, Dhari Al-Ajmi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article provides an objective integrated environmental impact assessment of the Gulf War consequences. The environmental damage was evaluated and found to be significantly exaggerated by the media and speculators. The total amount of burned crude oil was calculated to be 52.5 million metric tons. Most air pollution field measurements were comparable to those found in Western cities. The health impact associated with such exposure was found to be minimal. The total amount of oil released into the marine environment ranged between 2 and 4 million barrels, much less than the early estimation of 12-14 million barrels. The marine environment is expected to recover much faster than earlier anticipations. Unlike water and air, soil pollution is likely to persist for some years to come.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)557-562
Number of pages6
JournalEnvironmental Management
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1993

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Soil pollution
Environmental impact assessments
Petroleum
Air pollution
Environmental impact
marine environment
Oils
environmental impact
Crude oil
Health
soil pollution
Water
health impact
environmental impact assessment
Air
crude oil
atmospheric pollution
oil
air
water

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Environmental impact
  • Gulf War
  • Kuwait fires
  • Oil pollution
  • Soil pollution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Environmental impact of the Gulf War : An integrated preliminary assessment. / Khordagui, Hosny; Al-Ajmi, Dhari.

In: Environmental Management, Vol. 17, No. 4, 07.1993, p. 557-562.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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