Endemic Dengue Fever

A seldom recognized hazard for Pakistani children

Fahad Javaid Siddiqui, Syed Rizwan Haider, Zulfiqar Ahmed Bhutta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Dengue fever (DF) has gained prominence as an epidemic disease in Pakistan in the recent years. However, little data exists to show its likely endemic nature. Methodology: We retrospectively analyzed blood for dengue IgM on samples obtained during a community-based surveillance for febrile illnesses in two slum areas of Karachi, Pakistan, between June 1999 and December 2001. In this period, no epidemic of DF occurred in the city. Participants were children older than 16 years who had fever ≥ 38°C for more than 72 hours and in whom other common infections were excluded, based on clinical examination and laboratory tests (blood culture, urinalysis, complete blood count, Typhidot® test and peripheral blood film for malaria). Results: One hundred and fourteen blood samples were analyzed for dengue IgM ELISA, out of which 54 (47.4%) tested positive. The incidence of DF in this community was possibly as high as 185 (95% CI: 145 - 242) per hundred thousand population/year. Older children (10-15 years) appeared 5.5 times more likely to be affected than their younger (0-5 years) counterparts. Conclusions: DF is probably endemic in children in slums of Karachi, and likely to have high incidence rate. Older children are more susceptible to the disease. Further prospectively designed research is needed to confirm these findings. Until that time, DF may be included in the differential diagnosis of fever without focus in children in Karachi slums even in non-epidemic periods.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)306-312
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infection in Developing Countries
Volume3
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Dengue
Poverty Areas
Fever
Pakistan
Immunoglobulin M
Urinalysis
Blood Cell Count
Incidence
Hematologic Tests
Malaria
Differential Diagnosis
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Infection
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Children
  • Dengue
  • Fever
  • Pakistan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Endemic Dengue Fever : A seldom recognized hazard for Pakistani children. / Siddiqui, Fahad Javaid; Haider, Syed Rizwan; Bhutta, Zulfiqar Ahmed.

In: Journal of Infection in Developing Countries, Vol. 3, No. 4, 2009, p. 306-312.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siddiqui, Fahad Javaid ; Haider, Syed Rizwan ; Bhutta, Zulfiqar Ahmed. / Endemic Dengue Fever : A seldom recognized hazard for Pakistani children. In: Journal of Infection in Developing Countries. 2009 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 306-312.
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