Effects of water-borne iron and calcium on the toxicity of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) to Daphnia carinata

R. A. Van Dam, M. J. Barry, J. T. Ahokas, D. A. Holdway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

First instar D. carinata neonates were exposed to 0, 10 or 50 mg l-1 diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and 0.5 (normal), 1.5 (high) or 3.9 (very high) mg l-1 Fe, or 0, 1 or 10 mg l-1 DTPA and <5 (low), 20 (normal) or 100 (high) mg l-1 Ca, in a two and one brood experiment, respectively. Daphnids exposed to 0 mg l-1 DTPA/3.9 mg l-1 Fe died within three days, while those exposed to 50 mg l-1 DTPA/0.5 mg l-1 Fe died after 6-9 days. The former was attributed to Fe toxicity, and the latter to DTPA toxicity. Daphnids exposed to 10 mg l-1 DTPA/3.9 mg l-1 Fe produced 56.3 ± 8.0 offspring per adult, which was similar to control daphnids (0 mg l-1 DTPA/0.5 mg l-1 Fe) at 63.5 ± 5.6 offspring per adult, but significantly greater than daphnids exposed to 10 mg l-1 DTPA at both 0.5 and 1.5 mg l-1 Fe. Chemical equilibrium modelling indicated that the decrease in DTPA toxicity at high Fe concentrations was potentially due to an increase in the amount of available Fe, not to the total binding-out of DTPA with Fe, as was initially suspected. When exposed to Ca concentrations of <5 mg l-1, growth rate of D. carinata was severely reduced, and reproductive maturity delayed. However, when also exposed to 1 mg l-1 DTPA, there was a further reduction in growth rate and associated parameters, while at 10 mg l-1 DTPA/<5 mg l-1 Ca, all daphnids died. Chemical equilibrium modelling indicated that the increase in DTPA toxicity at very low Ca concentrations was potentially due to a further decrease in the amount of available Ca, as a result of chelation by DTPA. The major effects observed at 1 mg l-1 DTPA/<5 mg l-1 Ca would most likely result in adverse population level consequences, and may be of environmental concern.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-66
Number of pages18
JournalAquatic Toxicology
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1998

Fingerprint

Daphnia carinata
Daphnia
Pentetic Acid
DTPA
Iron
calcium
iron
toxicity
Calcium
Water
acids
water
chemical equilibrium
effect
chelation

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Daphnia carinata
  • DTPA toxicity
  • Growth
  • Iron
  • Reproduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Effects of water-borne iron and calcium on the toxicity of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) to Daphnia carinata. / Van Dam, R. A.; Barry, M. J.; Ahokas, J. T.; Holdway, D. A.

In: Aquatic Toxicology, Vol. 42, No. 1, 05.1998, p. 49-66.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "First instar D. carinata neonates were exposed to 0, 10 or 50 mg l-1 diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and 0.5 (normal), 1.5 (high) or 3.9 (very high) mg l-1 Fe, or 0, 1 or 10 mg l-1 DTPA and <5 (low), 20 (normal) or 100 (high) mg l-1 Ca, in a two and one brood experiment, respectively. Daphnids exposed to 0 mg l-1 DTPA/3.9 mg l-1 Fe died within three days, while those exposed to 50 mg l-1 DTPA/0.5 mg l-1 Fe died after 6-9 days. The former was attributed to Fe toxicity, and the latter to DTPA toxicity. Daphnids exposed to 10 mg l-1 DTPA/3.9 mg l-1 Fe produced 56.3 ± 8.0 offspring per adult, which was similar to control daphnids (0 mg l-1 DTPA/0.5 mg l-1 Fe) at 63.5 ± 5.6 offspring per adult, but significantly greater than daphnids exposed to 10 mg l-1 DTPA at both 0.5 and 1.5 mg l-1 Fe. Chemical equilibrium modelling indicated that the decrease in DTPA toxicity at high Fe concentrations was potentially due to an increase in the amount of available Fe, not to the total binding-out of DTPA with Fe, as was initially suspected. When exposed to Ca concentrations of <5 mg l-1, growth rate of D. carinata was severely reduced, and reproductive maturity delayed. However, when also exposed to 1 mg l-1 DTPA, there was a further reduction in growth rate and associated parameters, while at 10 mg l-1 DTPA/<5 mg l-1 Ca, all daphnids died. Chemical equilibrium modelling indicated that the increase in DTPA toxicity at very low Ca concentrations was potentially due to a further decrease in the amount of available Ca, as a result of chelation by DTPA. The major effects observed at 1 mg l-1 DTPA/<5 mg l-1 Ca would most likely result in adverse population level consequences, and may be of environmental concern.",
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AU - Barry, M. J.

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AU - Holdway, D. A.

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N2 - First instar D. carinata neonates were exposed to 0, 10 or 50 mg l-1 diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and 0.5 (normal), 1.5 (high) or 3.9 (very high) mg l-1 Fe, or 0, 1 or 10 mg l-1 DTPA and <5 (low), 20 (normal) or 100 (high) mg l-1 Ca, in a two and one brood experiment, respectively. Daphnids exposed to 0 mg l-1 DTPA/3.9 mg l-1 Fe died within three days, while those exposed to 50 mg l-1 DTPA/0.5 mg l-1 Fe died after 6-9 days. The former was attributed to Fe toxicity, and the latter to DTPA toxicity. Daphnids exposed to 10 mg l-1 DTPA/3.9 mg l-1 Fe produced 56.3 ± 8.0 offspring per adult, which was similar to control daphnids (0 mg l-1 DTPA/0.5 mg l-1 Fe) at 63.5 ± 5.6 offspring per adult, but significantly greater than daphnids exposed to 10 mg l-1 DTPA at both 0.5 and 1.5 mg l-1 Fe. Chemical equilibrium modelling indicated that the decrease in DTPA toxicity at high Fe concentrations was potentially due to an increase in the amount of available Fe, not to the total binding-out of DTPA with Fe, as was initially suspected. When exposed to Ca concentrations of <5 mg l-1, growth rate of D. carinata was severely reduced, and reproductive maturity delayed. However, when also exposed to 1 mg l-1 DTPA, there was a further reduction in growth rate and associated parameters, while at 10 mg l-1 DTPA/<5 mg l-1 Ca, all daphnids died. Chemical equilibrium modelling indicated that the increase in DTPA toxicity at very low Ca concentrations was potentially due to a further decrease in the amount of available Ca, as a result of chelation by DTPA. The major effects observed at 1 mg l-1 DTPA/<5 mg l-1 Ca would most likely result in adverse population level consequences, and may be of environmental concern.

AB - First instar D. carinata neonates were exposed to 0, 10 or 50 mg l-1 diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) and 0.5 (normal), 1.5 (high) or 3.9 (very high) mg l-1 Fe, or 0, 1 or 10 mg l-1 DTPA and <5 (low), 20 (normal) or 100 (high) mg l-1 Ca, in a two and one brood experiment, respectively. Daphnids exposed to 0 mg l-1 DTPA/3.9 mg l-1 Fe died within three days, while those exposed to 50 mg l-1 DTPA/0.5 mg l-1 Fe died after 6-9 days. The former was attributed to Fe toxicity, and the latter to DTPA toxicity. Daphnids exposed to 10 mg l-1 DTPA/3.9 mg l-1 Fe produced 56.3 ± 8.0 offspring per adult, which was similar to control daphnids (0 mg l-1 DTPA/0.5 mg l-1 Fe) at 63.5 ± 5.6 offspring per adult, but significantly greater than daphnids exposed to 10 mg l-1 DTPA at both 0.5 and 1.5 mg l-1 Fe. Chemical equilibrium modelling indicated that the decrease in DTPA toxicity at high Fe concentrations was potentially due to an increase in the amount of available Fe, not to the total binding-out of DTPA with Fe, as was initially suspected. When exposed to Ca concentrations of <5 mg l-1, growth rate of D. carinata was severely reduced, and reproductive maturity delayed. However, when also exposed to 1 mg l-1 DTPA, there was a further reduction in growth rate and associated parameters, while at 10 mg l-1 DTPA/<5 mg l-1 Ca, all daphnids died. Chemical equilibrium modelling indicated that the increase in DTPA toxicity at very low Ca concentrations was potentially due to a further decrease in the amount of available Ca, as a result of chelation by DTPA. The major effects observed at 1 mg l-1 DTPA/<5 mg l-1 Ca would most likely result in adverse population level consequences, and may be of environmental concern.

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