Effect of diesel exhaust particles on renal vascular responses in rats with chronic kidney disease

Y. M. Al Suleimani, A. S. Al Mahruqi, M. Al Za'abi, A. Shalaby, M. Ashique, A. Nemmar, B. H. Ali

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several recent studies have indicated the possible association between exposure to particulate air pollution and the increased rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with kidney diseases. The link of this observation to vascular damage has not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this study aims to investigate possible vascular damage that might be associated with exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DP) in adenine (AD)-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats, and the possible ameliorative effect of gum acacia (GA). CKD was induced by feeding AD (0.75%, w/w), and DP (0.5 mg/kg) was instilled intratracheally every second day and GA was given concomitantly in the drinking water at a dose of 15% w/v. All treatments were given concomitantly for 28 days. Changes in renal blood flow (RBF) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were monitored in these animals after anesthesia, together with several other endpoints. Exposure to DP significantly reduced RBF and this was significantly potentiated in AD-treated rats. Phenylephrine-induced decreases in RBF and increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were severely potentiated in rats exposed to DP, and these actions were significantly augmented in AD-treated rats. GA did not significantly affect the vascular impairment induced by AD and DP given together. This study provides experimental evidence that exposure to particulate air pollution can exacerbate the vascular damage seen in patients with CKD.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEnvironmental Toxicology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

Vehicle Emissions
Adenine
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
diesel
Blood Vessels
Rats
Gum Arabic
blood
Renal Circulation
Kidney
Blood Pressure
Blood
Blood pressure
Air Pollution
Air pollution
damage
atmospheric pollution
Kidney Diseases
Phenylephrine
morbidity

Keywords

  • Adenine
  • Blood flow
  • Blood pressure
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Diesel exhaust particles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Toxicology
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

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title = "Effect of diesel exhaust particles on renal vascular responses in rats with chronic kidney disease",
abstract = "Several recent studies have indicated the possible association between exposure to particulate air pollution and the increased rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with kidney diseases. The link of this observation to vascular damage has not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this study aims to investigate possible vascular damage that might be associated with exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DP) in adenine (AD)-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats, and the possible ameliorative effect of gum acacia (GA). CKD was induced by feeding AD (0.75{\%}, w/w), and DP (0.5 mg/kg) was instilled intratracheally every second day and GA was given concomitantly in the drinking water at a dose of 15{\%} w/v. All treatments were given concomitantly for 28 days. Changes in renal blood flow (RBF) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were monitored in these animals after anesthesia, together with several other endpoints. Exposure to DP significantly reduced RBF and this was significantly potentiated in AD-treated rats. Phenylephrine-induced decreases in RBF and increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were severely potentiated in rats exposed to DP, and these actions were significantly augmented in AD-treated rats. GA did not significantly affect the vascular impairment induced by AD and DP given together. This study provides experimental evidence that exposure to particulate air pollution can exacerbate the vascular damage seen in patients with CKD.",
keywords = "Adenine, Blood flow, Blood pressure, Chronic kidney disease, Diesel exhaust particles",
author = "{Al Suleimani}, {Y. M.} and {Al Mahruqi}, {A. S.} and {Al Za'abi}, M. and A. Shalaby and M. Ashique and A. Nemmar and Ali, {B. H.}",
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T1 - Effect of diesel exhaust particles on renal vascular responses in rats with chronic kidney disease

AU - Al Suleimani, Y. M.

AU - Al Mahruqi, A. S.

AU - Al Za'abi, M.

AU - Shalaby, A.

AU - Ashique, M.

AU - Nemmar, A.

AU - Ali, B. H.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Several recent studies have indicated the possible association between exposure to particulate air pollution and the increased rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with kidney diseases. The link of this observation to vascular damage has not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this study aims to investigate possible vascular damage that might be associated with exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DP) in adenine (AD)-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats, and the possible ameliorative effect of gum acacia (GA). CKD was induced by feeding AD (0.75%, w/w), and DP (0.5 mg/kg) was instilled intratracheally every second day and GA was given concomitantly in the drinking water at a dose of 15% w/v. All treatments were given concomitantly for 28 days. Changes in renal blood flow (RBF) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were monitored in these animals after anesthesia, together with several other endpoints. Exposure to DP significantly reduced RBF and this was significantly potentiated in AD-treated rats. Phenylephrine-induced decreases in RBF and increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were severely potentiated in rats exposed to DP, and these actions were significantly augmented in AD-treated rats. GA did not significantly affect the vascular impairment induced by AD and DP given together. This study provides experimental evidence that exposure to particulate air pollution can exacerbate the vascular damage seen in patients with CKD.

AB - Several recent studies have indicated the possible association between exposure to particulate air pollution and the increased rate of morbidity and mortality in patients with kidney diseases. The link of this observation to vascular damage has not been adequately addressed. Therefore, this study aims to investigate possible vascular damage that might be associated with exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DP) in adenine (AD)-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats, and the possible ameliorative effect of gum acacia (GA). CKD was induced by feeding AD (0.75%, w/w), and DP (0.5 mg/kg) was instilled intratracheally every second day and GA was given concomitantly in the drinking water at a dose of 15% w/v. All treatments were given concomitantly for 28 days. Changes in renal blood flow (RBF) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were monitored in these animals after anesthesia, together with several other endpoints. Exposure to DP significantly reduced RBF and this was significantly potentiated in AD-treated rats. Phenylephrine-induced decreases in RBF and increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were severely potentiated in rats exposed to DP, and these actions were significantly augmented in AD-treated rats. GA did not significantly affect the vascular impairment induced by AD and DP given together. This study provides experimental evidence that exposure to particulate air pollution can exacerbate the vascular damage seen in patients with CKD.

KW - Adenine

KW - Blood flow

KW - Blood pressure

KW - Chronic kidney disease

KW - Diesel exhaust particles

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